Ghost gum tree

This is a ghost gum tree they are every where in the outback in Australia

Australian native grass tree (Xanthorrhoea Australis). The flower stalk is reported to have been used to make aboriginal spears. by Chris & Steve on Flickr

The Grass Tree, Xanthorrhoea australis native to Australia. In times past the flower stalk is reported to have been used by aboriginals to make spears.

The Bottle Tree survives long periods of dryness in Northern Australia by storing water during the wet season. The fibrous tissues in the trunk and roots swell up as more and more water is absorbed. Aboriginal people needing water would chop into the bark and squeeze the soft, spongy wood to obtain a drink. The seeds, shoots and roots are edible and the trunk exudes a gum which is a source of starch. The wood was used for firemaking and for shields.

The Bottle Tree survives long periods of dryness in Northern Australia by storing water during the wet season. The fibrous tissues in the trunk and roots swell up as more and more water is absorbed. Aboriginal people needing water would chop into the bark and squeeze the soft, spongy wood to obtain a drink. The seeds, shoots and roots are edible and the trunk exudes a gum which is a source of starch. The wood was used for firemaking and for shields.

Gidyea or Gidgee Tree. This tree was used by the Kalkadoon people to make Nulla Nulla's, shields, boomerangs, swords and clapsticks. It is a very hard wood and will burn for hours in a fireplace. The gidgee gum can be eaten and is a bit like honey but with a slight sour taste and it can be eaten to cure a sore throat as well.

Gidyea or Gidgee Tree. This tree was used by the Kalkadoon people to make Nulla Nulla's, shields, boomerangs, swords and clapsticks. It is a very hard wood and will burn for hours in a fireplace. The gidgee gum can be eaten and is a bit like honey but with a slight sour taste and it can be eaten to cure a sore throat as well.

Iconic boab trees trace journeys of ancient Aboriginal people

Iconic boab trees trace journeys of ancient Aboriginal people

Cone of the Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii), the last surviving species of the Section Bunya of the genus Araucaria. It was widespread during the Mesozoic.Fossils of Bunya are found in South America and Europe. Cones are 20–35 cm - size of footballs. This one, ~20 cm lay by a trail in Maleny. The tree bears a crop only after 100 years old, then crops once every 2 or 3 years. Traditional food of the Aboriginal People, the nuts are eaten raw or roasted.

Cone of the Bunya pine (Araucaria bidwillii), the last surviving species of the Section Bunya of the genus Araucaria. It was widespread during the Mesozoic.Fossils of Bunya are found in South America and Europe. Cones are 20–35 cm - size of footballs. This one, ~20 cm lay by a trail in Maleny. The tree bears a crop only after 100 years old, then crops once every 2 or 3 years. Traditional food of the Aboriginal People, the nuts are eaten raw or roasted.

Alpinia caerulea Native Ginger Tree -

The Alpinia caerulea Native Ginger is A versatile plant for Aboriginal people.

Swallows Nest Farm: Colourful Summer Backyard Wedding

This January it was my pleasure to create some flowers for a simple backyard wedding in Hobart.

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