The 100 year anniversary of the Gallipoli landing is coming up in just one month. How will you be commemorating Anzac day? Visit www.australianwarstories.com.au to find out how we can help you discover and preserve the unique experience of your relative's time in war, told in a beautiful custom-made book. The illustration below of the landing was published in Melbourne's The Age on April 25, 1917.

The 100 year anniversary of the Gallipoli landing is coming up in just one month. How will you be commemorating Anzac day? Visit www.australianwarstories.com.au to find out how we can help you discover and preserve the unique experience of your relative's time in war, told in a beautiful custom-made book. The illustration below of the landing was published in Melbourne's The Age on April 25, 1917.

Gallipoli Landing "What matters it even if we are going to lose 70 per cent of our strength, as the pessimist predicts. Have we not been chosen as the covering brigade - the place of honour? Are we not the envied of the envious?" - 3rd Brigade Officer from New Glenelg, South Australia, 1915 (photo below published in The Queenslander in July 1915)

Gallipoli Landing "What matters it even if we are going to lose 70 per cent of our strength, as the pessimist predicts. Have we not been chosen as the covering brigade - the place of honour? Are we not the envied of the envious?" - 3rd Brigade Officer from New Glenelg, South Australia, 1915 (photo below published in The Queenslander in July 1915)

An Adelaide officer describes the morning of April 25, 1915 in a letter, published in The Advertiser in August: "At last the day had dawned. After eight long weeks of weary ship life and tedious waiting, coupled with incessant landing practices under all sorts of conditions, our particular brigade heaves one vast sigh of relief, and says 'only another meal on board'." bit.ly/AusWarStories

An Adelaide officer describes the morning of April 25, 1915 in a letter, published in The Advertiser in August: "At last the day had dawned. After eight long weeks of weary ship life and tedious waiting, coupled with incessant landing practices under all sorts of conditions, our particular brigade heaves one vast sigh of relief, and says 'only another meal on board'." bit.ly/AusWarStories

"At 10 o'clock each night the whole of the British Artillery used to open up on the one movement. It was as if someone had lifted the lid of Hell. The ground would shake like a leaf, and it was a continuous wall of shells passing over our heads. The flashes from the guns used to light up the country for miles around. - Gunner George Edgar Thomas, 1st Field Artillery Brigade, 1916

"At 10 o'clock each night the whole of the British Artillery used to open up on the one movement. It was as if someone had lifted the lid of Hell. The ground would shake like a leaf, and it was a continuous wall of shells passing over our heads. The flashes from the guns used to light up the country for miles around. - Gunner George Edgar Thomas, 1st Field Artillery Brigade, 1916

"Gentleman. - We have the honur to bring befour your kind notice that our shop is consider among the high class shop in Cairo. That progress is the result of the sanitary equipments maintained in Cairo the shop sharpness. A. cleanliness of our razors mark (Bengal) and the skilfulness of our workmen who are all acquainted with the English language…” bit.ly/AusWarStories

"Gentleman. - We have the honur to bring befour your kind notice that our shop is consider among the high class shop in Cairo. That progress is the result of the sanitary equipments maintained in Cairo the shop sharpness. A. cleanliness of our razors mark (Bengal) and the skilfulness of our workmen who are all acquainted with the English language…” bit.ly/AusWarStories

In a war of “machines, steel and iron juggernauts, rolling wheels, speed and wear,” technical units were crucial. “Though the infantryman continues an integral part of the Army scheme of things he has been superseded, to an extent, by machines and mechanical war weapons… Who keeps them turning? In a word, the Army tradesmen,” Tasmania’s The Mercury reported. This photo was published in Melbourne's The Australasian in January 1941. bit.ly/AusWarStories ‪#‎WWII‬ ‪#‎training‬

In a war of “machines, steel and iron juggernauts, rolling wheels, speed and wear,” technical units were crucial. “Though the infantryman continues an integral part of the Army scheme of things he has been superseded, to an extent, by machines and mechanical war weapons… Who keeps them turning? In a word, the Army tradesmen,” Tasmania’s The Mercury reported. This photo was published in Melbourne's The Australasian in January 1941. bit.ly/AusWarStories ‪#‎WWII‬ ‪#‎training‬

A set of Australian War Stories, just printed. bit.ly/AusWarStories

A set of Australian War Stories, just printed. bit.ly/AusWarStories

The first batch of Australian War Stories have just been printed! bit.ly/AusWarstories

The first batch of Australian War Stories have just been printed! bit.ly/AusWarstories


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