Lyndhurst Sydney.
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Lyndhurst house was built between 1834 and 1837 as a 'suburban villa' with view to Blackwattle Bay by Verge for Bowman, the principal colonial surgeon and his wife Mary. Mary was a daughter of graziers John and Elizabeth Macarthur.
Lyndhurst was built for Dr James Bowman, the principal Colonial Surgeon, on 36 acres he acquired in 1833. John Verge (1782-1836) was the architect. James Bowman (1784-1846)  had arrived in the colony in 1819 to succeed D'Arcy Wentworth as principal surgeon. In 1823 he married Mary Isabella, the second daughter of John and Elizabeth Macarthur, and they lived at Sydney Hospital and later at Woolloomooloo.

Lyndhurst was built for Dr James Bowman, the principal Colonial Surgeon, on

In 1972 the Sydney Press reported the fate of Dr Bowman's splendid residence with such headlines as "Dog racing put before old mansion", "History stands in way of expressway", "Fight to save another battered piece of history", and, with Members of Parliament describing the house as "of little interest" and "decrepit".

In 1972 the Sydney Press reported the fate of Dr Bowman's splendid residence…

Plan of ground floor. The design of the house in many ways resembles Verge's earlier Camden Park, which was built for the Macarthur family between 1831 and 1835. While, however, it is similar in detail, the arrangement of rooms is quite different and the house is larger in scale.

Plan of ground floor. The design of the house in many ways resembles Verge's…

Lyndhurst Entry Hall after the removal of a later concrete floor. The entrance hall, drawing room, library and dining room have now been restored in their original form and color scheme. Sections of the original plaster and joinery have been left exposed to show the evidence for the colour schemes.

Lyndhurst Entry Hall after the removal of a later concrete floor. The entrance…

Lyndhurst. 1979. The house was unoccupied, it became further vandalised, the roof finally rusted through, fires were lit by various derelicts who squatted in the building, the southern ridge was burnt out, water poured in through the rusted box gutters and broken windows and doors. It became the home of pigeons and vermin of every description.

Lyndhurst. 1979. The house was unoccupied, it became further vandalised, the roof finally rusted through, fires were lit by various derelicts who squatted in the building, the southern ridge was burnt out, water poured in through the rusted box gutters and broken windows and doors. It became the home of pigeons and vermin of every description.

View from Blackwattle Bay from window of Ultimo House, by E. Manning 1837. Lyndhurst can be seen on the opposite hill. Blackwattle Bay was subsequently reclaimed and is now Wentworth Park.

View from Blackwattle Bay from window of Ultimo House, by E. Manning Lyndhurst can be seen on the opposite hill. Blackwattle Bay was subsequently reclaimed and is now Wentworth Park.

St Mary's College, Lyndhurst, Glebe, 1874. In 1852 the bank sold the property to the Roman Catholic Church for St Mary's College. The historical significance of Lyndhurst is as much due to it's association with Church education as with the Bowman Family. From 1847 until 1849 it Housed St James College, Australia's first theological college.

St Mary's College, Lyndhurst, Glebe, 1874. In 1852 the bank sold the property to the Roman Catholic Church for St Mary's College. The historical significance of Lyndhurst is as much due to it's association with Church education as with the Bowman Family. From 1847 until 1849 it Housed St James College, Australia's first theological college.

Darghan Street Facade. 1971. Until 1973 it had been occupied but the Department of Main Roads evicted the tenants preliminary to it's demolition and things got steadily worse. The original house remained and it's restoration was feasible. In 1972 restoration architect Clive Lucas consented to chair the Save Lyndhurst Committee to try and get the route of the expressway changed and Lyndhurst protected for eventual restoration.

Darghan Street Facade. 1971. Until 1973 it had been occupied but the Department of Main Roads evicted the tenants preliminary to it's demolition and things got steadily worse. The original house remained and it's restoration was feasible. In 1972 restoration architect Clive Lucas consented to chair the Save Lyndhurst Committee to try and get the route of the expressway changed and Lyndhurst protected for eventual restoration.

Plan of the house and grounds in 1847. This estate commands about a mile of frontage to the bay. It is beautifully wooded, and has a considerable extent of glade or lawn within thriving forest scenery. The house is the principal feature in the landscape. Thick masses of wood branch off from the back part of the house.This estate will present a splendid instance of what may be effected by knowledge, taste and wealth.

Plan of the house and grounds in 1847. This estate commands about a mile of frontage to the bay. It is beautifully wooded, and has a considerable extent of glade or lawn within thriving forest scenery. The house is the principal feature in the landscape. Thick masses of wood branch off from the back part of the house.This estate will present a splendid instance of what may be effected by knowledge, taste and wealth.

Pupils at the school conducted by Mrs Agnes Watt, c.1890. One of the dwelling (No. 57 Darghan Street) became the Lyndhurst Private School run by Miss Agnes Watt and it continued to function until 1908. The property changed hands several times after Asher's death in 1909, first to Joseph McFarland and then in 1925 to Aubrey Bartlett, whose widow sold it to the Department of Main Roads in 1972.

Pupils at the school conducted by Mrs Agnes Watt, c.1890. One of the dwelling (No. 57 Darghan Street) became the Lyndhurst Private School run by Miss Agnes Watt and it continued to function until 1908. The property changed hands several times after Asher's death in 1909, first to Joseph McFarland and then in 1925 to Aubrey Bartlett, whose widow sold it to the Department of Main Roads in 1972.

The Staircase Slowly Takes Shape. Ownership was transferred to the Historic House Trust of NSW in 1984 and the trust is continuing conservation work. When work is completed the Trust's administrative headquarters will be located on the first floor, part of the ground floor will be available for community groups and kindred organisations to hold meetings and functions.

The Staircase Slowly Takes Shape. Ownership was transferred to the Historic House Trust of NSW in 1984 and the trust is continuing conservation work. When work is completed the Trust's administrative headquarters will be located on the first floor, part of the ground floor will be available for community groups and kindred organisations to hold meetings and functions.

Carving The Handrail on The Staircase. Of major significance is the reconstruction of the central staircase which has been painstakingly constructed to replicate in form and detail the original stairs.

Carving The Handrail on The Staircase. Of major significance is the reconstruction of the central staircase which has been painstakingly constructed to replicate in form and detail the original stairs.

Lyndhurst. 1979. Restoration commenced in 1979 under the auspices of the Heritage Council of New South Wales with the aim of returning the house to it's original splendid form. Work has been going on ever since and from the rubbish has emerged a house which has more than vindicated those who endeavoured to save it. Despite the alterations and damage, enough evidence remained to accurately restore the house. The long process of conservation work is expected to be completed in 1986.

Lyndhurst. 1979. Restoration commenced in 1979 under the auspices of the Heritage Council of New South Wales with the aim of returning the house to it's original splendid form. Work has been going on ever since and from the rubbish has emerged a house which has more than vindicated those who endeavoured to save it. Despite the alterations and damage, enough evidence remained to accurately restore the house. The long process of conservation work is expected to be completed in 1986.

The Glebe Society: Our 2007 Christmas Party   Our social calendar for 2007 ended with a garden cocktail party for about 140 members and friends held at Lyndhurst,one of Glebe’s finest heritage homes. Due to the generosity of Tim Eustace, Salvatore and the little princess Leila, we were given the opportunity to admire first hand this beautiful heritage house.

The Glebe Society: Our 2007 Christmas Party Our social calendar for 2007 ended with a garden cocktail party for about 140 members and friends held at Lyndhurst,one of Glebe’s finest heritage homes. Due to the generosity of Tim Eustace, Salvatore and the little princess Leila, we were given the opportunity to admire first hand this beautiful heritage house.

Sydney

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