Australian troops approach a German-held strong point under the protection of a heavy smoke screen somewhere in the Western Desert, in Northern Africa on November 27, 1942. (AP Photo)

World War II: The North African Campaign ~ Australian troops approach a German-held strong point under the protection of a heavy smoke screen somewhere in the Western Desert, in Northern Africa on November (AP Photo)

A Fuzzy Wuzzy Angel assists a wounded Australian soldier, Papua New Guinea, 1942.The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels was the name given by Australian troops to a group of Papua New Guinean people who, during WW2, assisted and escorted injured Australian troops down the Kokoda trail. Fuzzy-Wuzzy was a British 19th century term referring to the Hadendoa warriors of the Sudan and their elaborate butter-matted hairstyles. The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels were named for both their frizzy hair and helpful role.

A blinded Australian soldier (Private George Whittington) is guided to a field hospital away from the battlefront by a Papuan native (Raphael Oimbari). Buna, Northern Province, Papua New Guinea. Christmas Day, Photo by George Silk

Australian Soldiers on the Kokoda Track, New Guinea WWII.

This week in our history: Infantry Battalion conducted a fighting withdrawal over the Kokoda Trail to stop the Japanese advance on Port Moresby.

A jeep carrying a Japanese general pauses in front of a group of Australian soldiers during the surrender of Japanese forces in New Guinea.

A Jeep carrying a Japanese general pauses in front of a group of Australian soldiers during the surrender of Japanese forces in New Guinea.You can only imagine what is being shouted to him.

1942-11-23. New Guinea. Gorari. Most of the hand to hand fighting took place in the Gorari region, where one Australian unit killed and buried over 500 Japanese. The Japanese dead were buried in common graves, 5, 6, and up to 10 in one grave. Their steel helmets were placed on the top of the graves. In this photo is an Australian burying party.

Most of the hand to hand fighting took place in the Gorari region, where one Australian unit killed and buried over 500 enemy troops. The Japanese dead were buried in common graves, five, six and .

Kokoda Track campaign - Soldiers of the Australian 39th Battalion in September 1942

Kokoda Track campaign - Soldiers of the Australian Battalion in September 1942

Dense jungles, like this one in which Australians are marching single file, cover about three-quarters of Malaya and lie between the Japanese and Singapore. The jungle is pitch black in spots and dotted with pill-boxes. The few roads of Malaya are minded as well, acting as a natural defense against the invading enemy forces (LIFE, 22 Dec 1941)

Dense jungles, like this one in which Australians are marching single file, cover about three-quarters of Malaya and lie between the Japanese and Singapore. The jungle is pitch black in spots.

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