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Milk, Cream & Butter

Collection by Carnamah Historical Society & Museum

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Most farms and some townspeople kept a cow to provide their household with milk and its by-products of cream and butter. Making butter was a manual and time consuming task. It involved equipment used to separate the cream from milk and then churn it into butter.

Carnamah Historical Society & Museum
This cream can was used by Mrs Kate McIntosh of Carnamah to send cream to Perth, which supplemented her income. The latches on each side rise over the thin part at the top to keep the lid firmly in place. Perth, Museums, Household, Milk, Old Things, Butter, Rustic, Canning, Cream

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This cream can was used by Mrs Kate McIntosh of Carnamah to send cream to Perth, which supplemented her income. The latches on each side rise over the thin part at the top to keep the lid firmly in place.

Daisy Bowman milking a cow on Home Farm in Carnamah, with two cows feeding to the right. Virtual Museum, Western Australia, The Past, Milk, Butter, Cows, Cream, Daisy, Avon

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Daisy Bowman milking a cow on Home Farm in Carnamah, with two cows feeding to the right.

Milk drum, also known as a pail or bucket Milk Cans, Historical Society, Drum, Cow, Household, Bucket, Canning, Antiques, Antiquities

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Milk drum, also known as a pail or bucket

After milking fresh milk was poured through a milk strainer to remove any hair or dust that may have fallen in. Milk strainers, like the one shown here, were often made to screw onto large metal cans. Virtual Museum, Fresh Milk, Utensils, Avon, Repurposed, Household, Butter, Gems, Chocolate

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After milking fresh milk was poured through a milk strainer to remove any hair or dust that may have fallen in. Milk strainers, like the one shown here, were often made to screw onto large metal cans.

Online exhibition on Milk, Cream and Butter including historic equipment, photographs, articles and stories. Virtual Museum, Fresh Milk, Light Cream, Historical Society, Skimmed Milk, Household, Butter, Large Bowl, Canning

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Milk separators were used to separate milk into cream and skimmed milk. Fresh milk was poured into the large bowl at the top and the handle manually turned. This once new technology was called centrifugal separation. The milk would go down from the bowl and into a spinning mechanism that would result in the heavier milk particles being pulled outwards while the lighter cream particles would gather in the middle. The skimmed milk and cream would then come out of separate spouts.

Following separation butter churns were used to churn cream into butter. Cream was added to the churns and turning the handle would move a paddle inside. Water and salt was added at certain intervals. Churning Butter, Virtual Museum, Paddle, Decorative Bells, Avon, Turning, Household, Salt, Gems

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Following separation butter churns were used to churn cream into butter. Cream was added to the churns and turning the handle would move a paddle inside. Water and salt was added at certain intervals.

Butter pats were used to remove the butter from a butter churn and press it into a solid rectangular shape. In some instances, especially if it would be for sale, the pats would instead be used to push the butter into moulds. Churning Butter, Modern Times, Historical Society, Knife Block, Avon, Household, Milk, Dining Room, Gems

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Butter pats were used to remove the butter from a butter churn and press it into a solid rectangular shape. In some instances, especially if it would be for sale, the pats would instead be used to push the butter into moulds.

These butter wrappers were printed in Carnamah at The North Midland Times newspaper office for Mrs Ivy G. Allen of Mi Blu Aven Farm in Winchester. Times Newspaper, Milk, Butter, Cream, Winchester, Ephemera, Avon, Repurposed, Gems

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These butter wrappers were printed in Carnamah at The North Midland Times newspaper office for Mrs Ivy G. Allen of Mi Blu Aven Farm in Winchester.

Sometimes more butter than what the home required was made with the excess being sold to increase the household income. The printing office of the local newspaper in Carnamah manufactured specialised butter papers for this purpose. Foodie Quotes, Household Income, Dining Ware, Virtual Museum, Cooking Gadgets, Serveware, Newspaper, Ephemera, Avon

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Sometimes more butter than what the home required was made with the excess being sold to increase the household income. The printing office of the local newspaper in Carnamah manufactured specialised butter papers for this purpose.