Damien Kelly

Damien Kelly

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Damien Kelly
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NYT Cooking: Calling a dish "Texas Chili,” especially if you’re not a native of that state, is clearly asking for trouble. But this recipe of mine, refined over years of potlucks and Super Bowl parties, is too good to keep under wraps any longer. Its depth of flavor comes from using so many different chile types — fresh green jalapeños, earthy-sweet whole dried anchos, pure pasilla...

NYT Cooking: Calling a dish "Texas Chili,” especially if you’re not a native of that state, is clearly asking for trouble. But this recipe of mine, refined over years of…

Mississippi Roast is traditionally made by placing a chuck roast in a slow cooker and simmering it beneath a stick of butter, a package of ranch dressing mix, another of “au jus” gravy mix and a handful of pepperoncini. But replacing the packaged mixes re

NYT Cooking: This is a very hearty, chunky soup filled with bits of browned mushroom and silky baby spinach. A combination of sweet and savory spices – cinnamon, coriander and cumin – gives it a deep, earthy richness. For the most complex flavor, use several kinds of mushrooms and cook them until they are dark golden brown and well caramelized.

This is a very hearty, chunky soup filled with bits of browned mushroom and silky baby spinach. A combination of sweet and savory spices – cinnamon, coriander and cumin – gives it a deep, earthy richness. (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

NYT Cooking: This salad is made from uncooked broccoli tossed with an assertive garlic, sesame, chile and cumin-seed vinaigrette slicked with good extra-virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. The acid “cooks” the florets a little as ceviche does fish. After an hour, the broccoli softens as if blanched, turning bright emerald, and soaking up all the intense flavors of the dressing. You’ll...

NYT Cooking: This salad is made from uncooked broccoli tossed with an assertive garlic, sesame, chile and cumin-seed vinaigrette slicked with good extra-virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. The acid “cooks” the florets a little as ceviche does fish.