The Australian Federal Police is relying on an old and flawed law to reach into some disturbing new places. From the NBN raids to investigating a doctor who spoke out about asylum seeker care, it's looking decidedly anti-democratic.

Australian police shootings kill man threatened to kill the prime minister

Just as fundamental is the issue of whistleblower protection. The whole aim of the police involvement is to identify someone who has revealed information about a government-owned enterprise that taxpayers might think they have a right to know.

THE Australian Federal Police might have raided the Labor Party, but it’s Malcolm Turnbull they hurt.

AFP raids Labor Party offices, home in Melbourne over leaked NBN documents - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Australian Federal Police officers search the office of a senior Labor frontbencher and the home of an Opposition staffer in a move described as extraordinary and unprecedented during an election campaign.

That in itself bears more scrutiny. This is a publicly-owned company, sure, but it's a company, governed by the Corporation's Act, and involved in commercial enterprise. Is it really the AFP's role to investigate leaks from it?   Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2016/nbn-leaks-were-of-public-interest-so-why-the-late-night-police-raids-20160520-gozkqh.html#ixzz49AP1dkkI  Follow us: @theage on Twitter | theageAustralia on Facebook

Let's be clear. The news stories about the failings of Malcolm Turnbull's National Broadband Network which led to last night's police raids were squarely in the public interest.

When Guardian Australia reporter Paul Farrell put in a request for his federal police file, the response demonstrated chilling threats to press freedom

The AFP and me: how one of my asylum stories sparked a 200-page police investigation

Guardian Australia journalist Paul Farrell displays his police files compiled by Australian federal police

When Guardian Australia reporter Paul Farrell put in a request for his federal police file, the response demonstrated chilling threats to press freedom

The AFP and me: how one of my asylum stories sparked a 200-page police investigation

Guardian Australia journalist Paul Farrell displays his police files compiled by Australian federal police

The Australian Federal Police have put more than 1800 people at risk of the death penalty, mainly in Asia, in the past five years, by cooperating with foreign police forces.

Executions imminent: Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran. "Bali nine death sentence judges 'asked for bribes' for a lighter sentence: new claim"

AFP to be investigated over its refusal to examine whether Bronwyn Bishop broke the law

AFP to be investigated over its refusal to examine whether Bronwyn Bishop broke the law – Written by BEVAN SHIELDS

But it's understood Labor is not happy with the AFP's response and will write to it again on Saturday asking for clarification.  Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/bronwyn-bishop-expense-scandal-investigation-in-the-hands-of-finance-department-20150718-gif75a.html#ixzz3gCcvTWyQ

Liberal Speaker Bronwyn Bishop's use of supposedly independent Speaker's office for Liberal Party fund-raisers her position as impartial Speaker ''untenable''.

Graham Perrett asks AFP to probe Mal Brough on Peter Slipper diary

Graham Perrett asks AFP to probe Mal Brough on Peter Slipper diary


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