African mythology

African mythology ..Yoruba gods..Also used in different forms of voodoo religions, but under different names.

Yoruba African Orishas Poster Canvas Print / Canvas Art by James C Lewis

Eloko (pl, Biloko) is a term in a Mongo-Nkundo language referring to a kind of dwarf-like creature that lives in the forests. They are believed to be the spirits of ancestors of the people living there. Legend has it that they haunt the forest because they have some grudge to settle with the living and are generally quite vicious. Biloko live in the densest and darkest part of the rain forest in central Zaire, jealously and ferociously guarding their treasures: the game and the rare fruits…

(Art by Victor P Corbella) Eloko (plural: Bikolo) Origins-Mongo tribe (Congo) Zaire Habitat- Rainforest Dwarf/trolls Eloko (pl, Biloko) is a term in a Mongo-Nkundo language referring to a kind of dwarf-like creature that lives in the forests.

West African Benin Goddess MAWU-LISA. Mawu-Lisa are the creator deities of Dahomey mythology, associated with the moon and sun. In some myths, they are married twins; in others, both deities are aspects of the same androgynous or hermaphroditic deity.

Mawu-Lisa are the creator deities of Dahomey mythology, associated with the moon and sun. In some myths, they are married twins; in others, both deities are aspects of the same androgynous or hermaphroditic deity.

In the beginning of Yoruba mythology, the universe was composed of two elements, the ethereal sky above and a watery chaos below. Description from ancient-code.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

In the beginning of Yoruba mythology, the universe was composed of two elements, the ethereal sky above and a watery chaos below. Two gods rule over both these primordial realms.

Mawu (“MAH-woo”). The goddess of Earth-and-sky, exalted in West African Vodun religion. She is goddess of the moon and and represents the wisdom of age. Mawu can help you age with grace and become an empowered elder. Together, with Lisa her twin flame, they form an androgynous two-in-one deity.

b-sama: ‘African Madonna’ African Madonna is a self-initiated project by illustration studio, Studio Muti. “Combining elements from South African tribal culture and referencing religious icons, we came up with our version of an “African Madonna”.

In Western Sudanic folklore a human hyena  hybrid creature is depicted as a cannibalistic monster who nightly transforms and terrorizes people, especially lovers Mythology Africa

Were-hyena- African folklore: a man that is a blacksmith by day was believed to turn into a bloodthirsty hyena/human hybrid monster by night.

#Oshun African Yoruba Goddess of love, fresh waters, and fertility. Oshun's compassionate, sensuous nature, and her water-element energy encourages healing, mothering, harmony, and going with the flow. #Ritual

Increase Chances of Pregnancy - 8 Ways to Boost Your Odds

"Anansi, the Spider God"

fairytalemood: “ “Anansi, the Spider God” by Bethany Minervino “ “Anansi, the trickster, features in popular mythology across western Africa. His stories are believed to have originated with the.

Isitwalangcengce- African myth: a hyena-like creature that has a basket attached to its head. He is extremely vicious and can overcome the bravest men. It stuffs its victims into its basket head and eats then later, however, It only eats their brain.

Isitwalangcengce- African myth: a hyena-like creature that has a basket attached to its head. He is extremely vicious and can overcome the bravest men. It stuffs its victims into its basket head and eats then later, however, It only eats their brain.

Anansi (/əˈnɑːnsi/ ə-nahn-see) is an African folktale character. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories. He is also one of the most important characters of West African and Caribbean folklore. He is also known as Ananse, Kwaku Ananse, and Anancy; and in the southern United States he has evolved into Aunt Nancy. He is a spider, but often acts and appears as a man.

Here's five trickster gods and heroes drawn from world mythology, from Ghana to the Basque region. What lessons does the Trickster have for us?

We do not really mean, we do not really mean that what we are about to say is true. A story, a story; let it come, let it go.   -the traditional Ashanti beginning of an Anansesem, or ‘spider tale’ Anansi (also known as Ananse, Kwaku Ananse, and Anancy) is a West African god, considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories. He acts on behalf of Nyame, his father and the Sky Father, bringing rain to stop fires and performing other duties for him.

We do not really mean, we do not really mean that what we are about to say is true. A story, a story; let it come, let it go. -the traditional Ashanti beginning of an Anansesem, or ‘spider tale’ Anansi (also known as Ananse, Kwaku Ananse, and Anancy) is a West African god, considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories. He acts on behalf of Nyame, his father and the Sky Father, bringing rain to stop fires and performing other duties for him.

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