Apollo 16: Duke on Crater's Edge by NASA on The Commons, via Flickr

(April Astronaut Charles M., Lunar Module pilot of the Apollo 16 mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples at Station no. 1 during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity at the Descartes landing site.

Apollo 16 patch - "Explore the Highlands"  Astronauts John W. Young, Charles M. Duke, Jr., and Thomas K. Mattingly II launched on April 16, 1972

Apollo 16

Apollo 16 patch - "Explore the Highlands" Astronauts John W. Young, Charles M. Mattingly II launched on April 1972

Apollo 16’s Ascent stage looks a bit the worst for wear during its rendezvous with the CSM | NASA

Apollo 16 Lunar Module "Orion" piloted by John Young and Charles Duke. Photo by Ken Mattingly from Command Module "Caspar"

Apollo 16's Lunar Roving Vehicle rolling about the surface of the moon. video stabilized using Deshaker v2.5 filter for VirtualDub 1.9.9 Source: Apollo Missi...

Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle rolling about the surface of the moon. video stabilized using Deshaker filter for VirtualDub Source: Apollo Missi.

NASA’s Opportunity Mars rover passed near this small, relatively fresh crater in April 2017, during the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 16 mission to the moon. The rover team chose to call it “Orion Crater,” after the Apollo 16 lunar module. The rover’s Panoramic Camera (Pancam) recorded this view. Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.

Martian crater provides reminder of Apollo moonwalk

African American Physicist and inventor George Carruthers built his first telescope at age 10,. Carruthers developed ways to use ultraviolet imaging in order to view images in deep space that were previously impossible to see. In 1972, Carruthers invented the "Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectograph," the first moon-based observatory. It was used in the Apollo 16 mission. Then, in 1986, one of his inventions captured an image of Hailey's Comet—the first time a comet had ever been pictured from…

George Carruthers Physicist / 1939 - Scientist George Carruthers created inventions, such as the ultraviolet camera, or spectograph, which was used by NASA in the 1972 Apollo 16 flight, revealing the mysteries of space and the Earth's atmosphere

Apollo 16 was the tenth manned mission in the American Apollo space program, the fifth & penultimate to land on the Moon and the first to land in the lunar highlands. The second of the so-called J-missions, the mission was crewed by Commander John Young, Lunar Module Pilot Charles Duke and Command Module Pilot Ken Mattingly. Launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 12:54 PM EST on April 16, 1972, the mission lasted 11 days, 1 hour, & 51 minutes, & concluded at 2:54 pm EST…

Apollo 16 was the tenth manned mission in the United States Apollo space program, the fifth and penultimate to land on the Moon and the first to land in.

La face cachée par la sonde Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter sur le même principe que l’énorme photo précédente de l’autre face :

L'histoire photographique de la Lune

Dark Side of the Moon. Photo by Apollo April 1972 ( Dark Side of the Moon = Sheltering of Domestic Animals)

Stabilized remastered footage from Apollo 16 mission of astronaut John W. Young riding around on the moon's surface

Speed-riding on the moon! LRV on the Moon - Apollo 16 - HD Video Stabilized

Apollo 16: Driving on the Moon  Video Credit: NASA    Explanation: What would it be like to drive on the Moon? You don't have to guess -- humans have actually done it. Pictured above, Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charles Duke recorded video during one such drive in 1972, with a digital version now available on the web.

Apollo 16 astronauts John Young and Charlie Duke take the lunar rover for a spin on the surface of the moon in this film footage of what became known as the "lunar rover Grand Prix". This footage was shot on film and is silent.

The Apollo 16 command module, with astronauts John W. Young, Thomas K. Mattingly II and Charles M. Duke Jr. aboard, nears splashdown in the central Pacific Ocean to successfully conclude a lunar landing mission. This overhead picture was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water. The splashdown occurred at 290:37:06 ground elapsed time at 1:45:06 a.m. (CST), April 27, 1972, at coordinates of 00:43.2 degrees south latitude and 156:11.4 deg

The Apollo 16 command module approaches splashdown in the central Pacific Ocean to successfully conclude a lunar landing mission. This overhead picture was taken from a recovery aircraft seconds before the spacecraft hit the water.

A false-color image of Earth in ultraviolet light taken from the surface of the Moon on the Apollo 16 mission. The day-side reflects a lot of UV light from the Sun, but the night-side shows faint bands of UV emission from the aurora caused by charged particles.[216]

A false-color image of Earth in ultraviolet light taken from the surface of the Moon on the Apollo 16 mission. The day-side reflects a lot of UV light from the Sun, but the night-side shows faint bands of UV emission from the aurora caused by charged particles.[216]

Astronaut John W. Young, the commander of Apollo 16, captured this image of Charles Duke collecting lunar samples near Plum Crater. Credit: NASA

Astronaut John W. Young, the commander of Apollo 16, captured this image of Charles Duke collecting lunar samples near Plum Crater. Credit: NASA

Lunar surface shortly after landing, Apollo 16 - Apollo 16 - Wikipedia

Lunar surface shortly after landing, Apollo 16 - Apollo 16 - Wikipedia

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