In the Amazon, around 17% of the forest has been lost in the last 50 years. We can help prevent deforestation by looking for the Forest Stewardship Council Rainforest Alliance label or going paperless while at work. http://www.friendsoftheamazon.org/index.html #GreenItLikeYouMeanIt

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

View of a Combine working in agricultural land in Santa Carmem, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest - Photo Journal - WSJ

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

A view of illegal logging in sawmill area in Rondon do Pará, Pará, Brazil.

Warming winter sends no love to Olympic bid cities  ...  All five cities vying to host the 2022 winter games could face some of the warmest weather they've ever seen when the Olympics open, according to a Daily Climate analysis.

Essay: The way we are in the world, changes the world . Heres something Native elders understand: Without respect for natural laws, no amount of technology will get us out of this mess. Why cant we hear that message?

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest - Photo Journal - WSJ

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

The forest is ashen after a fire process in Southern Pará, Brazil. July 2010. Rodrigo Baleia

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest - Photo Journal - WSJ

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

A sole Brazilian Nut Tree, isolated because of the deforestation and a degraded environment, sits on the land, December Rodrigo Baleia.

How Brazil is halting deforestation in the Amazon - video | Environment | The Guardian

How Brazil is halting deforestation in the Amazon - video

The Piton de la Fournaise volcano erupts on the remote Indian Ocean island of Reunion on Friday

In northern Mato Grosso, Brazil, tractors drag a huge chain in the soil for cleanup. July 2009. Rodrigo Baleia

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

In northern Mato Grosso, Brazil, tractors drag a huge chain in the soil for cleanup.

For most of human history, deforestation in the Amazon was primarily the product of subsistence farmers who cut down trees to produce crops for their families and local consumption. But in the later part of the 20th century, that began to change, with an increasing proportion of deforestation driven by industrial activities and large-scale agriculture. By the 2000s more than three-quarters of forest clearing in the Amazon was for cattle-ranching.

For most of human history, deforestation in the Amazon was primarily the product of subsistence farmers who cut down trees to produce crops for their families and local consumption. But in the later part of the 20th century, that began to change, with an increasing proportion of deforestation driven by industrial activities and large-scale agriculture. By the 2000s more than three-quarters of forest clearing in the Amazon was for cattle-ranching.

A logging truck drives past agricultural land in Santa Carmem, Mato Grosso, Brazil. July 2010. Rodrigo Baleia

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

A logging truck drives past agricultural land in Santa Carmem, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest - Photo Journal - WSJ

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

An area deforested for cattle ranching in northern Mato Grosso, Brazil.

Soil is prepared for soybean farming within the ‘Legal Amazon’ in Mato Grosso, Brazil. December 2008. Rodrigo Baleia

Paradise Lost: Aerial Images of Deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest

Soil is prepared for soybean farming within the ‘Legal Amazon’ in Mato Grosso, Brazil. December 2008. Rodrigo Baleia

Cattle ranching is the largest driver of deforestation in every Amazon country, accounting for 80% of current deforestation rates. Amazon Brazil is home to approximately 200 million head of cattle, and is the largest exporter in the world, supplying about one quarter of the global market. Low input cost and easy transportation in rural areas make ranching an attractive economic activity in the forest frontier; low yields and cheap land encourage expansion and deforestation.

Cattle ranching is the largest driver of deforestation in every Amazon country, accounting for 80% of current deforestation rates. Amazon Brazil is home to approximately 200 million head of cattle, and is the largest exporter in the world, supplying about one quarter of the global market. Low input cost and easy transportation in rural areas make ranching an attractive economic activity in the forest frontier; low yields and cheap land encourage expansion and deforestation.

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