Pinterest
Pullman train cars, the epitome of luxury Palace Cars, Superliners (284 of these), sleeping cars and passenger train cars, 1859-1981

Just a car guy : Pullman train cars, the epitome of luxury Palace Cars, Superliners of these), sleeping cars and passenger train cars,

Handsome photograph, in NYC, of Gilded Age Society member, Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, c.1915. The same year he perished, when he boarded the Lusitania, that was torpedoed by a German U-boat in c.1915. ~ {cwl}

New York City: Handsome photograph of Gilded Age Society member, Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, circa He perished the same year when he boarded the Lusitania, that was torpedoed by a German U-boat

Looking Back at Manhattan's Lost Gilded Age Mansions                                                                                                                                                                                 More

Looking back at Manhattan's lost Gilded Age mansions

- Charles M. Schwab mansion, West End Ave & Riverside Drive, 73 to 74 Sts, NYC, demolished 1948

The Gilded Age Era: The Astor Double Mansion on Fifth Avenue: the stairwell down which Mrs Caroline Astor fell

The Astor Double Mansion Overlooking Central Park On a sunny, June day while in Newport Mrs. Caroline Astor offered her friend, .

1905 .. 952 Fifth Ave. Gilded Age NYC ~ The William A. Clark Residence Demolition 1927

DEMOLISHED: The William A. Clark residence designed by Lord, Hewlett Hull and Kenneth Murchison in 1905 at 952 Fifth Avenue in New York City as seen during demolition in

American Gilded Age - " The Ladies' Book of Etiquette, and Manuel of Politeness", c.1872. Originally published by Lee & Shepard (New York, Boston). Authored by: Florence Hartley. ~ {cwlyons} ~ (Image: Hesperus Press)

American Gilded Age - " The Ladies' Book of Etiquette, and Manuel of Politeness", Originally published by Lee & Shepard (New York, Boston). Authored by: Florence Hartley.

In 1895 there were 300 live hummingbirds  hovering around an indoor fountain in honor of the Duke of Marlborough's visit to the Vanderbilt's  $11 million Marble House in Newport, RI.

In 1895 there were 300 live hummingbirds hovering around an indoor fountain in honor of the Duke of Marlborough's visit to Marble House built in Newport RI by William K. Vanderbilt, grandson of Commodore Vanderbilt.

This magnificent home was demolished in 1927 and today the site is occupied by the Bergdorf Goodman department store. The only remnant of the mansion are its magnificent gates, which today provide the entrance to Central Park's Conservatory Gardens at 104th and Fifth.

Looking back at Manhattan's lost Gilded Age mansions

Cornelius Vanderbilt II mansion (demolished) formerly at 1 West St, New York City. Architects George B Post and Richard Morris Hunt. Built 1882 with substantial 1894 addition. Demolished Vintage b&w photo.

Chicago's Greatest Surviving Gilded Age Mansions (Chicago Pin of the Day, 12/20/2015).

Chicago's Greatest Surviving Gilded Age Mansions, Mapped

Mansions of the Gilded Age: Estate of Nicholas Brady Inisfada, Manhasset, New York

Mansions of the Gilded Age: Estate of Nicholas Brady Inisfada, Manhasset, New York. It later became a Catholic retreat, but was torn down in 2013 to make way for luxury housing. I went here in grade for a retreat before my confirmation.

A close-up view, of the Gilded Age NYC mansion of society member, "The" Mrs. Caroline Astor ~ Location: 5th Avenue at 65th Street, built in c.1893. This photo taken in c.1929. ~ {cwlyons} ~ (Image: Gotham Magazine - Via: Getty Images)

A close-up view, of the Gilded Age NYC mansion of society member, "The" Mrs. Caroline Astor ~ Located: Ave at Street, built in ~ This photo, ~~ (Getty images) ~~ {cwl}

Mansions of the Gilded Age: Search results for facebook

Astor and the This is an artists depiction of Mrs. Astor holding court in her Fifth Avenue Mansion at one of her balls.

Great Hall of the Breakers mansion in Newport, Rhode Island, USA (1893).

The Central Hall at Breakers Newport for Cornelius Vanderbilt, 1893 - Lady Henrietta Spencer Churchill, American Friends of British Art, Palm Beach - Homa Nasab for MuseumViews - 17

Miss Helen Hay and her bridesmaids. Miss Hay was the daughter of John Hay who had been private secretary to President Lincoln and later Ambassador to the Court of St. James under President McKinley. Mr. Whitney who, like his father, went to Yale, was 26. For a wedding gift, Col. Payne gave the couple a Stanford White house at 972 Fifth Avenue.

Helen Hay on her wedding day in 1902 to Payne Whitney. Besides her role as a socialite and philanthropist, she was a poet, writer and race horse breeder. She founded the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation.