Costume Plate (Tricoteuse 1793) | LACMA Collections

Timberland Boots Fold Down

Costume Plate (Tricoteuse {knitting machine} France, century Hand-colored engraving on paper LACMA Collections

Sans culottes were men of the working class who supported the Revolution. Instead of wearing knee-breeches, or culottes, these men wore trousers.

Sans culottes were men of the working class who supported the Revolution. Instead of wearing knee-breeches, or culottes, these men wore trousers.

A Republican Beau - French Revolutionary Fashion Plate (Note the man hanging from the gallows in the background and the guillotine on the left)

Sans Culottes were made up of the working class men in support of the French Revolution.  They normally wore trousers,  carmagnole jackets, red waistcoats, clogs, and red peasant hats.

Sans Culottes were made up of the working class men in support of the French Revolution. They normally wore trousers, carmagnole jackets, red waistcoats, clogs, and red peasant hats. this man carries a halbred.

In the French Revolution, the sans-culottes were the radical partisans of the lower classes; typically urban laborers.  The appellation refers to the fashionable culottes (silk knee-breeches) of the moderate bourgeois revolutionaries, as distinguished from the working class sans-culottes, who traditionally wore pantaloons (pants). During the peak of their influence, roughly 1792 to 1795, the sans-culottes provided the principal support behind the two far-left

Sans culottes spoke for the working class; the labor class men wore trousers to support the Revolution. The nobility wore knee breeches and sans culottes means without knee breeches.

Sans Culotte. These people were radical left wing partisans of the lower classes and typically wore the red cap of liberty, the carmagnole and pantaloons as their uniform.

Sans Culotte: This was the costume of people who were radical left wing partisans of the lower classes and typically wore the red cap of liberty, the carmagnole and pantaloons as their uniform.

The 18th Century: sans culottes {Sans culottes were the radical peasants and were poorly dressed, so their pantaloons that they wore were adapted to be called sans culottes. They were the first things called "pants."}

Sans-Culottes: 'sans' meaning without and 'culottes' meaning breeches breeches. People were wearing pantaloons like peasants. Counterrevolutionaries set themselves apart from the shabby ‘trouser-brigade’ (pantalonnades)

Sans-culotte - 1775–95 in Western fashion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sans-culottes: lower-class Parisian republicans in the French Revolution; the radical left-wing partisans of the lower classes in the French Revolution.

Sans culottes: were the first thing to be known as pants and were worn by lower classes that later became radical partisans during the French Revolution.

June: Rebellion and Counter Culture La Femme du Sans Culottes French Jacket, Striped Petticoat, Pinner Apron, and Provincial Head Covering

Sans-culottes - Group of working class men who supported the Revolution and wore trousers - hence the name "sans culottes" meaning "without knee breeches."

Sans-culottes - Group of working class men who supported the Revolution and wore trousers - hence the name "sans culottes" meaning "without knee breeches.

Un Ventre Plat et Des Abdos Musclés en SEULEMENT 6 MIN (sans équipement).

Un Ventre Plat et Des Abdos Musclés en SEULEMENT 6 MIN (sans équipement).

Sans Culottes: which means "without knee breeches" referred to the peasant look which became very popular during the French Revolution. Pantaloons and "the shabby trouser brigade" referred to the loose fitting trousers worn.

Pictures from the French Revolution

French cartoon depicting typical dress of the "sans-culottes." Sans-culottes were the left wing radicals that consisted of mainly lower class peasants.

Stripes worn in support of the French Revolution 1789.

Stripes worn in support of the French Revolution by female sans-culotte

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