The Wesylean Chapel where the Seneca Falls Convention was held. My husband and I are making the trip for our anniversary this year! So excited!

The Wesylean Chapel where the Seneca Falls Convention was held. Upstate New York

A two-day convention that was attended by almost 300 people (men and women), focused on this petition, the Declaration of Sentiments. This petition detailed the oppression men had imposed on women. Women wanted, and had been deprived, of legal rights, of the legal right to own their own property, of custody of their children in cases of divorce, of the right of higher education, etc… (1848)

Declaration of Sentiments of the Seneca Falls Convention – 1848 (women suffrage) primary source document w/ reading questions

Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, which was similar to the Declaration of Independence. It talked of equal rights for men and women. She was able to receive signatures for the Declaration of Sentiments at the Seneca Falls Convention.

On This Day in History, July 19, 1848: The first ever U.S. woman’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, NY with almost 200 women in attendance.

On This Day in History, July The first ever U. woman’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, NY with almost 200 women in attendance.

Seneca Falls, NY - site of the Seneca Falls Convention held in 1848, the first meeting to advocate women's rights

Seneca Falls, NY - site of the Seneca Falls Convention held in the first meeting to advocate women's rights

Declaration of Sentiments — Women's Rights, National Historical Park, New York — at the National Park Service web site.

First Wave Statue Exhibit: Women's Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls (less than an hour from Bonnie and Larry)

The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women’s rights convention in American history. In July of 1848, hundreds of women gathered in Seneca Falls, NY to kick off the convention, which eventually led to the Suffrage Movement. It began, with Elizabeth Cady Stanton reading through the Declaration of Sentiments for all the attendees to deliberate.

This Day in Resistance History: Declaration of Sentiments at Women’s Rights Convention, Seneca Falls 1848

Pageant celebrating the 75th anniversary of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, Garden of the Gods, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 1925. Photo by Harry L. Standley

Pageant celebrating the 75th anniversary of the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, Garden of the Gods, Colorado Springs, Colorado. 1925. Photo by Harry L. Standley

July 19, 1848: The Seneca Falls Convention for Women's Rights, the first of its kind in the US, began in New York. Organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Convention was attended by approximately 300 men and women and was considered to be the beginning of the Women’s Suffrage Movement.

The first-ever US women’s rights convention began in Seneca Falls, NY on July Approximately 300 men & women attended.

Seneca Falls Convention, beginning of the Women's Rights movement. Women's suffrage history.

In contrast with colonial America, the century sparked the Women's rights movement. Seneca Falls was a tipping point for the movement where women came together to discuss their distaste in the lack of respect and rights that women possessed at this time.

Public announcement of the first US Women's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls,  July 19 & 20, 1848

Public announcement of the first US Women's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls, July 19 & 1848

1848: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and others convene the first women's rights convention in the US in Seneca Falls, NY.

Declaration of Sentiments of the Seneca Falls Convention – 1848 (women suffrage) primary source document w/ reading questions

Elizabeth Cady Stanton on a platform -- likely speaking to a "promiscuous audience" (mixing men and women!) and possibly about to incite a riot.

"Marching with Aunt Susan: Susan B. Anthony and the Fight for Women's Suffrage". A children's book about a young girl, Bessie, who wants  to go hiking with her father and brothers. But it's 1896 and girls don't get to hike. They can't vote either, which Bessie discovers.  Ages 6 to 9.

Nineteenth-century American pioneers of women's suffrage Susan B. Anthony (standing) and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an American social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early woman's movement.

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