Intersectional Rosie the Riveter Print  by roaringsoftly on Etsy, $20.00

roaring-softly: “ Happy International Women’s Day, everyone! (or belated Women’s Day, depending on the time zone) Love, Tyler ”

"We Can Do It" poster by J. Howard Miller (1942).  NOTE: It was a year later, 1943, when Normal Rockwell painted his famous "Rosie the Riveter."

We Can Do It! (Rosie the Riveter)

Norman Rockwell... the original... "Rosie the Riveter" (1943)

Rosie the Riveter by Norman Rockwell, (An American woman employed in the production of military hardware during WWII. My mother was a Rosie Riveter and worked at the Rock Island Arsenal producing munitions.) Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.

"There is plenty of room for mediocre men, but no room for mediocre women. Women just need to work harder..." Madeleine Albright

Top 25 Fitness, Nutrition, and Lifestyle Tips for 2013

Rosie the Riveter, a U.S. cultural icon representing the American women who worked in factories during WWII

Top 10 Most Influential Females in Fitness for 2011

Rosie the Riveter, the original from This ad was created by J. Howard Miller for Westinghouse Electric. It was designed to boost morale during wartime as women took over jobs vacated by men.

Google Image Result for http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YJ42mbzltOw/TWwQiOwDPDI/AAAAAAAAApw/W8wZmdAnAlw/s1600/rosie_the_riveter.jpg

Rosie the Riveter Quotable Greeting Card & Stickers

Rosie the Riveter Card The icon of "We Can Do It" and a true icon of feminism, it's Rosie the Riveter with this die-cut quotable blank note card with stickers. You can customize you card with sticker

Rosie the Rivoter... perhaps the most famous of the war propaganda props aside from Uncle Sam, although nobody really knows her name as well.

J. Howard Miller (1918 – 2004)

is a WW II era American wartime propoganda poster produced by J. Howard Miller in 1943 for Westinghouse Electric as a tool to boost worker morale.

Geraldine Doyle, the woman who inspired the "We can do it" poster.

Geraldine Doyle, 86, dies; one-time factory worker inspired Rosie the Riveter and 'We Can Do It!' poster

Geraldine Doyle, "Rosie the Riveter". Geraldine Doyle was the inspiration behind the famous "Rosie the Riveter" poster.

An American icon telling women they are strong and not to forget it

Clever (and not slutty) Halloween Costumes

Women are not only beauty items to look at! They have so much more to it than that, so much the media wants to hide, even though it has been proven that females do better on exams than males.

Rosie the Riveter.  U.S. Government encouraged women to take the men's places who had gone off to fight the war, by working in factories across the country.

" is an American wartime propaganda poster produced by J. Howard Miller in 1943 for Westinghouse Electric as an inspirational image to boost worke

Rosie the Riveter was an inspiration for women working the factories during World War II. More recently, she has become a symbol of feminist movement and union labor.

Geraldine Hoff Doyle Dead: 'Rosie The Riveter' Inspiration Dies At 86

"Then, in a moment that no one quite expected, our shining star & radiant queen, the legendary Miss Britney Spears, turned her radiant countenance towards us.

Female trainees at Middletown, PA, 1944. The Middletown Air Service Command stockpiled parts and overhauled military airplanes. During WWII, Middletown’s workforce grew from 500 to more than 18,000, nearly half of them women.

Female trainees at Middletown, PA, The Middletown Air Service Command stockpiled parts and overhauled military airplanes. During WWII, Middletown’s workforce grew from 500 to more than nearly half of them women.

Marilyn Monroe, before she became a Hollywood star, appeared on the cover of "Yank" magazine while working in a Burbank, Ca., airplane factory. August, 1945.

Marilyn Monroe in 1944 then still known as Norma Jeane Dougherty. Monroe worked in a factory in Van Nuys, Calif., during World War II when army photographer David Conover captured her on film. The rest, as they say, is history.

Mexican American women workers on the Southern Pacific Railroad during WW II.

Mexican American women workers on the Southern Pacific Railroad during WW II. Photo courtesy of The Pop History Dig Online.

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