Ogun in fiery red.

Ogun in fiery red - the Yoruba God of Thunder and War-fury.

Orisa Lifestyle is a religious system based on the veneration of a supreme god through various deities (Orishas), and ancestral spirits. African-Americans who practice the Yoruba religious tradition have stated that Orisa Lifestyle provides a means for cultural identity and provides an opportunity to revisit and reclaim traditions that were denied to our ancestors during enslavement. For men and women of African descent, who are interested in Orisa Lifestyle, this course is perfect…

Orisa Lifestyle is a religious system based on the veneration of a supreme god through various deities (Orishas), and ancestral spirits. African-Americans who practice the Yoruba religious tradition have stated that Orisa Lifestyle provides a means for cu

FAB Art: The Yoruba African Orisha Experience: A Photographic Exhibition by James C. Lewis

FAB Art: The Yoruba African Orisha Experience: A Photographic Exhibition by James C.

YORUBA ORISHAS

Atlanta-based photographer James C. Lewis has come up with a photo series featuring gods and goddesses of the Yoruba religion. These deities.

Orishas by Noire 3000 aka James C. Lewis - Olorun

Lewis - African Gods & Goddesses Re-Envisioned in New “Yorùbá African Orishas” Photography Series

Oshun, West African goddess/orisha of sweet waters, beauty, love, artistry, and prosperity.

Oshun - West African goddess/orisha of sweet waters, beauty, love, artistry, and prosperity.

'Ibej'i (typed wrong) African child Deities of Youth and Vitality. Also known as the sacred twins, one male and one female.

These African Deities Are The Best Gods You've Never Heard Of

Ibeji: African Child Deities of youth and vitality. Also known as the sacred twins. One is male and the other is female, balancing the cosmic duality between masculine and feminine.

Goddess and Yoruba Orisha Yemaya! This is the card of letting go and Yemaya's affirmation is: I let go of what is for what will be. I release guilt, blame and shame. Ase! Card from the Womanifesting Fertility Goddess Oracle Card Deck.

Goddess and Yoruba Orisha Yemaya! This is the card of letting go and Yemaya's affirmation is: I let go of what is for what will be. I release guilt, blame and shame. Card from the Womanifesting Fertility Goddess Oracle Card Deck.

Photographer invokes spirits of the Yoruba orishas in “Ode to Oya” photo series - AFROPUNK

Yannis Guibinga is a Gabonese photographer who is based in Canada

african yoruba goddess oshun

African Oshun goddess statues of handpainted gypsum, goddess oshun flag and beautiful Oshun Ceramic Tile

Oshun is the Yoruban Orisha (deity) of the sweet or fresh waters (as opposed to the salt waters of Yemaya). She is widely loved, as She is known for healing the sick and bringing fertility and prosperity, and She especially watches over the poor and brings them what they need. As Orisha of love, Oshun is represented as a beautiful, charming and coquettish young woman. In some tales She is said to be a mermaid, with a fish's tail.

Oshun (or Osun, Oxum) is a Yoruba Orisha, the Spirit (some might say Goddess) of the River Osun in southwestern Nigeria, where Her sanctuary has a sacre.

The origin of the rainbow chakras and the kundalini serpent derive from the yoruba orisa system of ancient west africa, deified in the divinity osumare.  It was later taken to kemet ( ancient egypt ) and became the uraeas and then transfered to the andamanese of ancient india who established yoga which influenced buddhism.

Fibroid Mass

The origin of the rainbow chakras and the kundalini serpent derive from the yoruba orisa system of ancient west africa, deified in the divinity osumare. It was later taken to kemet ( ancient egypt ) and became the uraeas and then transfered to the andama

brazil: candomble priestess by chester higgins | via laeticia |Tumblr

An entry from [given] to love

laeticia: brazil: candomble priestess chester higgins [portfolio] candomble one of the many vestiges of African spirituality that surviv.

Pinterest
Search