Biological Name: Hymenanthera dentata Common Name: Tree Violet Family: Violaceae Origin: Eastern Australia Exposure: Partial Shade to Deep Shade Irrigation: Drought tolerant once established Frost: Frost Tolerant 25F-18F (-8C) Soil: Well-drained, alkaline, light to heavy Flower Color: Pale Yellow Scented Flower Time: Spring Height: 6-12' Width: Variable

Hymenanthera dentata [Tree Violet] part of the Violaceae family with Pale Yellow Scented flowers flowering in Spring avaliable from Australian Native Plants located in Ventura, CA

Acacia verniciflua, commonly known as varnish wattle,[2] is a shrub or small tree species that is endemic to Australia.[2] It has an erect or spreading habit, growing to between 1 and 6 metres high, The phyllodes are often sticky and lustrous and vary in length, width and shape. The globular pale-yellow flowerheads appear in the leaf axils from July to November, followed by seedpods that are up to 10 cm long and unconstricted. These contain shiny black seeds.

Acacia verniciflua, commonly known as varnish wattle,[2] is a shrub or small tree species that is endemic to Australia.[2] It has an erect or spreading habit, growing to between 1 and 6 metres high, The phyllodes are often sticky and lustrous and vary in length, width and shape. The globular pale-yellow flowerheads appear in the leaf axils from July to November, followed by seedpods that are up to 10 cm long and unconstricted. These contain shiny black seeds.

Bursaria spinosa opened fruit.jpg Bursaria spinosa is a small tree or shrub in the family Pittosporaceae. The species occurs in mainly in the eastern and southern half of Australia and not in Western Australia and the Northern Territory. Reaching 10 m (35 ft) high, it bears fragrant white flowers at any time of year but particularly summer.

Bursaria spinosa opened fruit.jpg Bursaria spinosa is a small tree or shrub in the family Pittosporaceae. The species occurs in mainly in the eastern and southern half of Australia and not in Western Australia and the Northern Territory. Reaching 10 m (35 ft) high, it bears fragrant white flowers at any time of year but particularly summer.

Daviesia leptophylla.jpg  Daviesia leptophylla, commonly known as narrow-leaf bitter-pea, is a broom-like shrub species in the family Fabaceae. It is endemic to Australia. It grows to 2 metres and has yellow and red pea flowers, produced between October and December in the species native range.[2

Daviesia leptophylla.jpg Daviesia leptophylla, commonly known as narrow-leaf bitter-pea, is a broom-like shrub species in the family Fabaceae. It is endemic to Australia. It grows to 2 metres and has yellow and red pea flowers, produced between October and December in the species native range.[2

Hibbertia obtusifolia 1.jpg Hibbertia obtusifolia, commonly known as hoary Guinea-flower, is a small shrub species that is native to south-eastern Australia. It grows to 60 cm high and has yellow flowers that appear in spring and summer.[1]

Hibbertia obtusifolia Hibbertia obtusifolia, commonly known as hoary Guinea-flower, is a small shrub species that is native to south-eastern Australia. It grows to 60 cm high and has yellow flowers that appear in spring and

Cassinia aculeata.jpg  Cassinia aculeata, also known as common cassinia, dolly bush or dogwood, is a shrub in the family Asteraceae. The species is native to the states of South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania in Australia.[2] It grows to between 1 and 2.5 metres high and has sticky, hair-covered leaves which are 10 to 30 mm long and 1 to 2 mm wide.[2] The creamy-white flowerheads appear in dense clusters from summer to autumn.[2]

Cassinia aculeata.jpg Cassinia aculeata, also known as common cassinia, dolly bush or dogwood, is a shrub in the family Asteraceae. The species is native to the states of South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania in Australia.[2] It grows to between 1 and 2.5 metres high and has sticky, hair-covered leaves which are 10 to 30 mm long and 1 to 2 mm wide.[2] The creamy-white flowerheads appear in dense clusters from summer to autumn.[2]

Austrodanthonia caespitosa  Common Name:	Common Wallaby-grass Synonym:	Danthonia caespitosa Family:	Poaceae Size:	20-40cm x 40cm, stems to 1.2m high

Austrodanthonia caespitosa Common Name: Common Wallaby-grass Synonym: Danthonia caespitosa Family: Poaceae Size: x stems to high

Asperula conferta  Common Name:	Common Woodruff Synonym:	 Family:	Rubiaceae Size:	to 20cm x 0.5-1m Description:	Erect to spreading perennial herb with square stems. Stems may have a few short hairs bent downwards. Leaves:	Small narrow leaves in rings of 5 or 6, ending in a short point, 2-12mm x 0.3-1mm. Hairs on margins and lower midrib only. Flowering:	Small tubular flowers in terminal clusters of 1-3, male and female on separate plants. Flower Colour:	White Flowering TimeSeptember to…

Asperula conferta Common Name: Common Woodruff Synonym: Family: Rubiaceae Size: to 20cm x 0.5-1m Description: Erect to spreading perennial herb with square stems. Stems may have a few short hairs bent downwards. Leaves: Small narrow leaves in rings of 5 or 6, ending in a short point, 2-12mm x 0.3-1mm. Hairs on margins and lower midrib only. Flowering: Small tubular flowers in terminal clusters of 1-3, male and female on separate plants. Flower Colour: White Flowering TimeSeptember to…

Acacia aculimatissima - snake wattle Acacia aculeatissima ‘Snake Wattle’ This is an easy care, low growing wattle, with fine foliage forming a dense groundcovering mat. It bears yellow ball flowers in late winter to early spring. It grows to around a metre wide, and from groundcovering to a metre tall. Great for coastal gardens, as well as being frost and drought tolerant. Suits full sun to lightly shaded spots. Good for most soil types as long as they are well drained

Acacia aculimatissima - snake wattle Acacia aculeatissima ‘Snake Wattle’ This is an easy care, low growing wattle, with fine foliage forming a dense groundcovering mat. It bears yellow ball flowers in late winter to early spring. It grows to around a metre wide, and from groundcovering to a metre tall. Great for coastal gardens, as well as being frost and drought tolerant. Suits full sun to lightly shaded spots. Good for most soil types as long as they are well drained

Photo of Acacia rubida. Erect, usually bushy shrub or tree 2–10 m high, mostly single-stemmed; bark finely fissured, brownish; branchlets angled or terete, usually glabrous.

Photo of Acacia rubida. Erect, usually bushy shrub or tree m high, mostly single-stemmed; branchlets angled or terete, usually glabrous.


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