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Sirin and Alkonost The Birds of Joy and Sorrow, by Viktor Vasnetsov. 1896.

(this is persephonish to me) Viktor Vasnetsov, Sirin (left) and Alkonost (right): Birds of Joy and Sorrow 1896

Три царевны подземного царства. Виктор Васнецов

Три царевны подземного царства. Виктор Васнецов

Sirin and Alkonost—The Birds of Joy and Sorrow (1896), Viktor Vasnetsov

nigra-lux: “ VASNETSOV, Viktor Mikhaylovich Sirin and Alkonost – Birds of Joy and Sorrow, details 1896 Ed.

"Na Sociedade do Espetáculo, em que a imagem é a grande rainha e nós somos seus mais fiéis súditos, quem não se divulga chega a ser visto como sem vida social, sem amigos: quase inexistente. O espetáculo exige a espetacularização de fatos e até comer pode se tornar uma atração."

a bela adormecida na era do amor virtual

VASNETSOV, Viktor Mikhaylovich (1848-1926) Sirin and Alkonost – Birds of Joy and Sorrow, details 1896

nigra-lux: “ VASNETSOV, Viktor Mikhaylovich Sirin and Alkonost – Birds of Joy and Sorrow, details 1896 Ed.

Slavic mother and daughter Fates, dual-nature spirits are common in Slavic mythology, for example the Zorya - Goddess of Dusk and Dawn

Mother Mokosh, a major Slavic Goddess of the Earth, also called Mati-Syra-Zemlya, or "Moist Mother Earth." Mokosh spins flax and wool at night and shears sheep. (Fate) She is a Goddess of fecundity and midwifery.

Under a waning moon (venusmilk: Artuš Scheiner poems inspired by old...)

venusmilk: “ Artuš Scheiner poems inspired by old Czech myths ”

Sirin and Alkonost by Alivis on DeviantArt. Sirin and Alkonost, birds of joy and sorrow. Sirin is a mythological creature of Russian legends, with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird (usually an owl).

Egyptian spirit *** Sirin and Alkonost by Alivis on DeviantArt. Sirin and Alkonost, birds of joy and sorrow. Sirin is a mythological creature of Russian legends, with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird (usually an owl).

from http://www.writersfunzone.com/blog/2011/04/06/wild-woman-archetype-who-is-baba-yaga/

Baba Yaga or Baba Roga (also known by various other names) is a haggish or witchlike character in Slavic folklore. She flies around on a giant mortar, kidnaps (and presumably eats) small children, and lives in a hut that stands on chicken legs.

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