Explore Festival Foods, Festivals and more!

薄饼.jpg

The Five Food on Tomb Sweeping Day

Ancestor veneration was also practiced at grave sites, and the solar (!) festival of Qīngmíng 清明 (usually falling on April 5) is associated with tomb "sweeping" followed by presentation of incense and sacrificial foods or other gifts to the dead. (The sacrificial food was often then consumed in a graveside "feast," as shown here.

Jordan: Traditional Chinese Family and Lineage

Dressing a grave w/flowers and food; Beijing; annual Tomb Sweeping Festival, Qing Ming

With spring comes Ching Ming; Grave Sweeping Day in the Chinese cultural tradition.

Tomb-sweeping Day (DVD w/Eng subtitle)(WX0W)

Tomb-sweeping Day (DVD w/Eng subtitle)(WX0W)

Qingming Festival: Qingming is a festival of remembrance. Chinese people sweep the tombs of their ancestors in a yearly mark of respect. This is why Qingming is also known as the Tomb-Sweeping Day. After slightly sweeping the tombs, people offer food, flowers and favorites of the dead, then bow before the memorial tablet. Qingming was frequently mentioned in ancient Chinese works, the most famous one is the poem by Du Mu.

Qingming Festival: Qingming is a festival of remembrance. Chinese people sweep the tombs of their ancestors in a yearly mark of respect. This is why Qingming is also known as the Tomb-Sweeping Day. After slightly sweeping the tombs, people offer food, flowers and favorites of the dead, then bow before the memorial tablet. Qingming was frequently mentioned in ancient Chinese works, the most famous one is the poem by Du Mu.

Qingtuan, a traditional taste for the Qingming Festival  April 4 this year marks the traditional Chinese Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day. During the festival, people in east China like to eat Qingtuan, a sweet green rice dumpling. In the past, it was used to worship ancestors, but nowadays people eat it as a fresh festive food.  The custom of preparing Qingtuan and other offerings dates back to the Zhou Dynasty over 2,000 years ago.

Qingtuan, a traditional taste for the Qingming Festival April 4 this year marks the traditional Chinese Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb-Sweeping Day. During the festival, people in east China like to eat Qingtuan, a sweet green rice dumpling. In the past, it was used to worship ancestors, but nowadays people eat it as a fresh festive food. The custom of preparing Qingtuan and other offerings dates back to the Zhou Dynasty over 2,000 years ago.

The #traditional #Chinese lunar calendar divides the year into 24 #solar terms. Tomb-sweeping (Chinese: 清明), the 5th solar term, starts this year on Apr 4 and ends on Apr 19.  Of all the 24 solar terms, Tomb-sweeping is the only one whose first day is also a traditional Chinese festival, Tomb-Sweeping Day. The words "clear" and "bright" describe the weather during this period. Temperatures begin to rise and #rainfall increases, making it a crucial time for plowing and sowing in the #spring.

The #traditional #Chinese lunar calendar divides the year into 24 #solar terms. Tomb-sweeping (Chinese: 清明), the 5th solar term, starts this year on Apr 4 and ends on Apr 19. Of all the 24 solar terms, Tomb-sweeping is the only one whose first day is also a traditional Chinese festival, Tomb-Sweeping Day. The words "clear" and "bright" describe the weather during this period. Temperatures begin to rise and #rainfall increases, making it a crucial time for plowing and sowing in the #spring.

Qingming Festival - time to honour loved ones who have passed over. Clear weeds from graves, add fresh soold and flowers. Leave out the person's favourite food and wine. In the evening light lanterns, fly kites and cut strings whilst still in flight

Qingming Festival (also known as Pure Brightness Festival or Tomb-sweeping Day), falls on either April or of the solar calendar. 2018 Qingming Festival falls on April

Pinterest
Search