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tumor - j.gardner pathology

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Osteosarcomas are malignant bone forming tumours and the second most common primary bone tumour after multiple myeloma. They account for ~ 20% of all primary bone tumours.  Osteosarcomas can be divided into a number of sub types according to degree of differentiation, location within the bone, and histological variants.  Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/osteosarcoma

Osteosarcomas are malignant bone forming tumours and the second most common primary bone tumour after multiple myeloma. They account for ~ 20% of all primary bone tumours. Osteosarcomas can be divided into a number of sub types according to degree of differentiation, location within the bone, and histological variants. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/osteosarcoma

Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (aka PCP).   Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an atypical pulmonary infection and the most common opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).     Classically, PCP was the acronym for pneumocystis carinii pneumonia but, the causative organism was reclassified as pneumocystis jirovecii. Strictly speaking, pneumocystis carinii refers to a species found in rats.    Read more…

Gross pathology of lungs infected with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia Related articles Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia respiratory manifestations of AIDS HIV / AIDS

AML  The textbook 'tri-phasic' appearance is not always present which can pose a diagnostic dilemma.  On histology the typical three components (vessels, smooth muscle and fat) are seen in variable proportions, but ‘monophasic’ and ‘biphasic’ can be seen, especially if the tumour is only minimally sampled (eg, core biopsy). Tumour cells are usually positive on immunohistochemistry for HMB45, CD117, CD63, and negative for cytokeratin.  Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/cases/angiomyolipoma-7

The textbook 'tri-phasic' appearance is not always present which can pose a diagnostic dilemma. As a pathologists, we are seeing more core biopsies taken to try and identify the tumour type. On histology the typical three components (vessels, smo.

Mixed germ cell tumour of the testis  1. Embryonal cell carcinoma. 2. Teratoma. 3. Seminoma.   A testicular teratoma, unlike ovarian teratoma, is often aggressive in its biological behaviour, and often exists as part of testicular mixed germ cell tumours.    Mature teratomas tend to be cystic with heterogeneous echoes in the fluid representing a mixture of mucinous or sebaceous material with or without hair follicles.   Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/testicular-teratoma

Testicular ultrasound showed multiple intratesticular masses consistent with malignancy.

Retinoblastoma: DIAGNOSIS

Institute Ocular Oncology website provides information for patients and families as they cope with the diagnosis and treatment of eye cancer, intraocular tumors and related eye diseases.

Carotid body tumour, also known as a chemodectoma or carotid body paraganglioma, is a highly vascular glomus tumour that arises from the paraganglion cells of the carotid body. It is located at the carotid bifurcation with characteristic splaying of the ICA and ECA. Histologically they contain nests of polygonal cells (Zellballen) enclosed by trabeculating fibrous components and sustentacular cells. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/carotid-body-tumour

Gross pathology of a carotid body tumour. Gross section of CBP resected from an adult patient with a familial history of similar tumors. Grooves on either side represent impressions left by internal and external carotid artery branches.

A Krukenberg tumour (also referred to as a carcinoma mucocellulare) refers to a type of metastatic tumour to the ovary.The colon and stomach are the most common primary tumour to result in ovarian metastases, followed by the breast, lung, and contralateral ovary.   Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/krukenberg-tumour-1

A Krukenberg tumour (also referred to as a carcinoma mucocellulare) refers to a type of metastatic tumour to the ovary.The colon and stomach are the most common primary tumour to result in ovarian metastases, followed by the breast, lung, and contralateral ovary. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/krukenberg-tumour-1

Renal artery aneurysms (RAA)'s are considered the second most common visceral aneurysm (15-22 %), most common being splenic artery aneurysm (60%). It is more common in females. Most of the lesions are saccular and tend to occur at the bifurcation of main renal artery.  Contrast filled outpouching / mass lesion in the region or course of renal artery.  Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/renal-artery-aneurysm

Renal artery aneurysms (RAA)'s are considered the second most common visceral aneurysm (15-22 %), most common being splenic artery aneurysm (60%). It is more common in females. Most of the lesions are saccular and tend to occur at the bifurcation of main renal artery. Contrast filled outpouching / mass lesion in the region or course of renal artery. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/renal-artery-aneurysm

Colorectal carcinoma is common, accounting for 15% of all newly diagnosed cancers, and tends to be a disease of the elderly, with the median age of diagnosis between 60 and 80 years of age.  Colorectal cancers, 98% of which are adenocarcinomas, arise in the vast majority of cases from pre-existing colonic adenomas (neoplastic polyps), which progressively undergo malignant transformation as they accumulate additional mutations.  Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/colorectal-carcinoma

This case raises one of the difficulties regarding TNM staging in colorectal carcinoma;

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