This is an illustration of Banksia coccinea from Ferdinand Bauer's 1813 work Illustrationes Florae Novae Hollandiae. The scientific documentation and detail is remarkable. Under the direction of Norbert Boccius (1729–1806), a physician and botanist, Bauer began to contribute miniature drawings to Boccius’ collection. In 1780, Bauer was sent to Vienna to work under the direction of Nikolaus von Jacquin, an eminent botanist and Director of the Royal Botanical Garden at Schonbrunn Palace.

Australian Botanical Illustration Banksia coccinea Scarlet Banksia artist: Ferdinand Bauer from: 'Illustrationes Florae Novae Hollandiae' by Ferdinand Bauer

A remarkable ginkgo discovered by master propagator Crispin Silva as a chance mutation on the male cultivar ‘Jade Butterflies.' The upright plants showcase bold, highly variegated foliage with irregular streaks of green, cream and yellow. Each leaf is different yet the sum of the whole is breathtaking. The coloration is stable and sun tolerant remaining prominent throughout the growing season. I would love one, but they are sold out everywhere! I'm on a wait list.

A remarkable ginkgo discovered by master propagator Crispin Silva as a chance mutation on the male cultivar ‘Jade Butterflies.' The upright plants showcase bold, highly variegated foliage with irregular streaks of green, cream and yellow. Each leaf is different yet the sum of the whole is breathtaking. The coloration is stable and sun tolerant remaining prominent throughout the growing season. I would love one, but they are sold out everywhere! I'm on a wait list.

The 'society garlic' is one of my favorite plants. I had lots of this in my garden and later found that it came in a variegated version too so I did a watercolor painting of it.  I love putting the flowers in salads.

The 'society garlic' is one of my favorite plants. I had lots of this in my garden and later found that it came in a variegated version too so I did a watercolor painting of it. I love putting the flowers in salads.

Albrecht Durer's “Rhinoceros” 16th Century  An Irish collector likely inked his flower and plant specimens and then  pressed them on the borders of this print of an Indian rhinoceros made from a woodcut created in 1515 by artist Albrecht Durer.  Durer created this illustration of a Rhinoceros from descriptions of the animal. He had never seen one before.

Nature Printed Plants: Sir Hans Sloane’s copy of Albrect Dürer’s print of a rhinoceros has been decorated front and back with nature prints of flowers and leaves.

Someone left a paper bags of backbulbs, bulb type enlarged base of the plant, of this Bletilla striata, terrestrial orchid, on a bench with a "free" sign outside of our church one day. I took some an planted them and was rewarded with these these beautiful blooms. I had to record them in watercolor.

Someone left a paper bags of backbulbs, bulb type enlarged base of the plant, of this Bletilla striata, terrestrial orchid, on a bench with a "free" sign outside of our church one day. I took some an planted them and was rewarded with these these beautiful blooms. I had to record them in watercolor.

A Few Leaves from the Newly Invented Process of Nature Printing  in 1854  Henry Bradbury learned the painstaking method of electrotyping, which produces a metal facsimile of an object-- in this case a water mint--that is used to create a print. He learned the process in Austria, then patented the process in the United Kingdom, an act of industrial espionage.

gallery with audio

The first time I saw a mature wisteria in bloom, I was surprised to see that the young leaves were a bronze color. I loved the combination of bronze leaves and the lavender color blooms.

The first time I saw a mature wisteria in bloom, I was surprised to see that the young leaves were a bronze color. I loved the combination of bronze leaves and the lavender color blooms.

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