Aboriginal Technology -   picture 20 - A wiltja Source: Aboriginal Technology: Housing, Alex Barlow, Macmillan Education Australia (1994)

Aboriginal Technology - picture 20 - A wiltja Source: Aboriginal Technology: Housing, Alex Barlow, Macmillan Education Australia

Aboriginal Technology -   This house, which features a platform, was built as a shelter from wet weather. Source: Aboriginal Technology: Housing, Alex Barlow, Macmillan Education Australia (1994)

Aboriginal Technology - This house, which features a platform, was built as a shelter from wet weather.

Meriam House - Aborginal Environments Research Centre site at The University of Queensland A Meriam domed house, this being a particularly large example with a central post rather than a free-spanning dome structure. The interior sometimes contained tiered sleeping platforms and storage racks, with a fireplace next to the door. (Memmott)

Meriam house of the Torres Strait Islands. Courtesy of Queensland Museum and Aboriginal Environments Research Centre.

An Aboriginal temporary shelder, a 'gunya'

Replica of a temporary Aboriginal shelter. This is a ‘gunya’ that was rebuilt in…

Aboriginal shelter, Mt Browne Station  The remains of a mia mia - an aboriginal shelter, Mt Browne Station, Milparinka, Outback NSW.

Aboriginal shelter, Mt Browne Station The remains of a mia mia - an aboriginal shelter, Mt Browne Station, Milparinka, Outback NSW.

Aboriginal housing mostly consisted of simple shelters made from a framework of straight branches, then covered with leafy branches or sheets of bark.  The covering depended on locally available materials at the time. In some areas sheets of soft paperbark, easily pulled from trees, were available. In other areas stiffer sheets of thick stringy-bark were cut from trees, but if these were unavailable, then bushes and leafy branches were used.

My oldest and I have been exploring the culture of the local Gumbaingirr Indigenous tribe, maybe a traditional shelter is something we could construct too.

"The Gabarnmung Rock Shelter, owned by the Jawoyn tribe of Australia’s Northern Territory, is covered with Aboriginal art paintings dating back 35,500 years. Only 26 non-indigenous visitors have ever been invited into this sacred space, a naturally formed temple nestled into a sandstone formation."  Read more: http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/The-Sacred-Gabarnmung-Cave-in-Australia/#ixzz2hdokcoVu The Sacred Gabarnmung Rock Shelter in Australia - Oprah.com

Inside Gabarnmung Rock Shelter

Oprah Show Ultimate Viewers get a very rare look inside the Gabarnmung Rock Shelter, owned by the Jawoyn tribe, an extra special stop on Oprah's Ultimate Australian Adventure.

Google Image Result for http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/land/images/aboriginal-rock-shelter.jpg

Discover the multitude of Aboriginal sites and places and how Aboriginal people used them, sometimes for generations.

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