It's the centenary of the outbreak of World War 1 and various commemorative events will be held across Australia to remember our service men and women.

ANZAC Day April 100 years on. It's the centenary of the outbreak of World War 1 and various commemorative events will be held across Australia to remember our service men and women.

In the 1930s, after the Battle of Gallipoli, President Ataturk received a letter from the mothers of the fallen ANZAC soldiers requesting permission to visit the graves of their sons. In response he sat down and wrote this poignant letter to the women. Ataturk later used these same words in a speech to the first Australians, New Zealanders and British to visit the Gallipoli battlefields.

President Mustafa Kemal Ataturk in response to a letter from the mothers of the fallen ANZAC soldiers requesting permission to visit the graves of their sons.

Australian Soldiers on Anzac Cove 1915

World War 1 - ~ 1915 Australian soldiers at Gallipoli during bayonet charge.

June 1915, Gallipoli: a  camouflaged Turkish sniper/sharpshooter is captured by two Anzacs.

A Turkish sniper, dressed as a tree, is captured by two Anzacs in Gallipoli June 1915

Gallipoli battlefield cemetery statue of an Ottoman soldier carrying a wounded ANZAC soldier "As the cries of the wounded continued and the hot sun rose, the Anzacs were moved to pity. They had never seen such bravery before. A truce was arranged and Anzacs and Turks together helped to bury the dead." --A.K. Macdougall, Australia in History: Gallipoli and the Middle East, 1915-18, 2004

Gallipoli battlefield cemetery statue of an Ottoman soldier carrying a wounded ANZAC soldier

'With the camera at Anzac' – Lord Kitchener's farewell salute at Anzac, 14.11.15. This photograph is from an album of Anzac Cove and surrounding areas, taken in 1915 by three young Australians. www.nerangrsl.com

'With the camera at Anzac' – Lord Kitchener's farewell salute at Anzac, This photograph is from an album of Anzac Cove and surrounding areas, taken in 1915 by three young Australian soldiers.

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick (6 July 1892 – 19 May 1915), who served under the name John Simpson, was a stretcher bearer with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) during the Gallipoli Campaign in World War I. After landing at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915, he obtained a donkey and began carrying wounded British Empire soldiers from the frontline to the beach, for evacuation.

John "Jack" Simpson Kirkpatrick July 1892 – 19 May who served under…

ANZAC: Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.    On the 25th April, Australia and New Zealand celebrate the first major battle fought by Australian and New Zealand soldiers at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War 1. It is a day to remember the courage of the soldiers in this battle and the courage and sacrifice of all men and women who have served their country in times of war. April 25, 1915

ANZAC: Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. On the 25th April, Australia and New Zealand celebrate the first major battle fought by Australian and New Zealand soldiers at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War 1. It is a day to remember the courage of the soldiers in this battle and the courage and sacrifice of all men and women who have served their country in times of war. April 25, 1915

Leaving Gallipoli

An Australian soldier packed up and ready to evacuate from ANZAC Cove.

The Other Anzacs: Nurses at war 1914-1918 By Peter Rees The harrowing and dramatic stories of the Australian and New Zealand nurses who served in the Great War.

The Other Anzacs: Nurses at war By Peter Rees The harrowing and dramatic stories of the Australian and New Zealand nurses who served in the Great War.

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