Tasmanian Timber

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a kitchen with wooden cabinets and an island countertop in front of large glass windows
Tasmanian Timber | A not-so-little leap of faith
Phil Vanier’s leap from television commercials producer to furniture and cabinetry maker is about as big as it gets. But dig a little deeper and you start to uncover a common thread – a passion for craft, be it tangible or digital. When it came time to relocate to Tasmania with his family, Phil was ready to turn his passion into a full-time job, and so he carried the name with him – The Little Shed Project.
the stairs are made of wood and have glass windows on each side, along with wooden flooring
A John Wardle first, the crown jewel to Launceston’s Inveresk Library
Forming what was once part of Tasmania’s largest industrial site, Launceston’s Inveresk area is fast becoming the beating, cultural heart of the city. The redevelopment of the precinct area is the single largest infrastructure investment in the city’s history, and as part of the University of Tasmania’s transition to the area, the latest project to be unveiled is the new Inveresk Library. John Wardle Architects were commissioned to design the new library, a $23 million development.
the utensils are sitting in an open drawer
From tip to toe, Van Bone is a tribute to all that is good in Tasmania
A cruisy 50-minute drive outside of Hobart’s CBD towards the Tasman Peninsula sits Van Bone restaurant in Marion Bay. Upon arrival to the venue’s lush grounds, if your breath’s not taken by the area’s stunning scenery and million-dollar views, the new restaurant’s end to end dining experience surely will.
a wooden cabinet sitting in the middle of a room
Stillwater Seven
One of the oldest buildings in Launceston, the site was a former flour mill holding nearly two centuries of Tasmania’s history. While multiple businesses had called the building home since its origins as a flour mill, Cumulus Studio rebirthed the original building to meet this century’s demands while incorporating many of the site’s original elements, including its stunning use of Tasmania’s timber species. Images by Anjie Blair
a woman sitting on steps in front of a white house at night with lights on
Phoenix House by Harley Graham Architects - Project Feature - The Local Project
Phoenix House by Harley Graham Architects – Project Feature – The Local Project
The Cusp Table
Melbourne design week is an annual showcase of the best collectible contemporary design in Australia. Jon Goulder and Henry Williams chose Cusp CLT to design a minimalist table to showcase a collection of ceramics and tableware – “a grown-up response to a world where there is too much design”.
a wooden table with black vases on it and two stools next to it
The Cusp Table
Melbourne design week is an annual showcase of the best collectible contemporary design in Australia. Jon Goulder and Henry Williams chose Cusp CLT to design a minimalist table to showcase a collection of ceramics and tableware – “a grown-up response to a world where there is too much design”. Read the full story via the link provided.
four different views of cars parked in an empty parking garage with wooden walls and windows
Tasmanian Timber | Timber transforms Lexus of Tasmania showroom into an inviting home-like sanctuary
Lexus of Tasmania's new luxury sales suite in Hobart. Lined with Tasmanian Oak battens, with a low VOC finish, and adorned with generous curtains, the space is warm and inviting. Amongst the carefully parked Lexus vehicles, a collection of custom designed, handmade Tasmania Oak and soft leather furniture by Scott Van Tuil welcomes guests to sit. Photos by Adam Gibson.
an entrance to a building with stairs leading up to the front door and another set of metal handrails
Lands Building Office Redevelopment by Xsquared Architects
Xsquared Architects designed and documented a total refurbishment of the iconic Lands Building at 134 Macquarie Street in Hobart, Tasmania. Xsquared Architects created a standardised floor layout to provide each branch with the same level of amenity. This occurred by involving the different client groups in extensive consultation and dialogue. Photo credit: Rosie Hastie
the dining room table is surrounded by black chairs and wood paneled walls, along with a potted plant
Northcote House by Melanie Beynon
Tasmanian Oak was hand selected by the owner/builder to be used as an interior lining board for the home. To create a layered effect in the home’s interior, timber was specified for the floors, walls and ceiling.
an empty room with wooden floors and tables in front of large windows that look out onto the countryside
Tasmanian Architects Series: Scott Balmforth, Terroir
One of Terroir’s founding directors Scott Balmforth offers his insights on Tasmanian design and what it means to be sustainable in 2021.
an empty hallway leading to the beach with dark wood walls and doors on both sides
Tasmanian Architects Series: Thomas Bailey, Room11
Reflecting the wild and natural landscape of their surroundings into each project, Room11 showcases a perceptive and poetic expression that comes to life in each of their Tasmanian-centric designs.
the entrance to a building is lit up at night with lights on and dark clouds in the sky
Tasmanian Architects Series: Fred Ward, 1+2 Architecture
Meeting as teenagers at the University of Tasmania studying architecture, the three founding directors of 1+2 Architecture have homed in on what their design is truly about. Speaking to one of the firm’s Director’s, Fred Ward, we learn what’s behind one of the leaders of design on the Apple Isle.
a conference room with black leather chairs and wooden paneling on the ceiling, along with large windows
Tasmanian Architects Series: Cumulus Studio, Keith Westbrook
Cumulus Studio’s Keith Westbrook believes that good design can change the planet.
a living room filled with furniture and bookshelves on top of wooden flooring
Tasmanian Architects Series: Daniel Lane, Preston Lane
For Preston Lane Architects, balance and simplicity is everything. Old and new. Dark and light. Bold and neutral. Director Daniel Lane, offers his insights on Tassie design, what it means to be sustainable in 2020, and why he relates Tasmanian Oak to your favourite pair of jeans.