Celebrating International Bouillabaisse Day is quite appealing and it should be supported. Bouillabaisse is fisherman's stew from Marseille.

Something fishy about National Bouillabaisse Day

As Christmas approaches we will be looking forward to the seasonal feasts of rich food washed down with our favourite booze.

At Christmas we will be looking forward to the seasonal feasts of rich food washed down with our favourite booze. Booze was first a verb.

Tim Entwisle attentive to the magic of words takes RozelleTV on a journey.

Tim Entwisle attentive to the magic of words takes RozelleTV on a journey.

DILAPIDATE: When I came across the origin of the word dilapidate I was quite excited. There seemed the possibility of a great word of the week story.

DILAPIDATE: When I came across the origin of the word dilapidate I was quite excited. There seemed the possibility of a great word of the week story.

What Does It Mean To Be A Trump?

The idea of names determining professions has been around since the Romans who had a proverb nomen eat omen. But what is a trump?

HALLELUJAH Goodbye to Leonard Cohen. His most famous song Hallelujah comes from the words for praise to the Lord.

So what is the meaning of hallelujah?

SYMPATHY is when you are unhappy at the unhappiness of others; JOY is when you are happy at the happiness of others; ENVY is when you are unhappy at the happiness of others; and SCCHADENFREUDE is when you are happy at the unhappiness of others. This is how I understand it.

Schadenfreude is malicious joy in the misfortunes of others and has been in English since 1922 when it was first borrowed from the Germans.

ROSE-COLOURED-GLASSES Wearing rose-coloured glasses is an expression for seeing everything in an attractive, pleasant light. On one hand it is cheerful optimism that sees only the good in the world and on the other it is naïve, self-delusion.

A military working dog wears Doggles to protect his eyes as a Chinook helicopter takes off, May U. Army photo, by Sgt.

KNICKERS—I love the British word, knickers, for ladies underpants. It has a gentle naughtiness without being vulgar. In Britain it has surpassed all its rivals: smalls, briefs, panties, bloomers and completely replaced its predecessor, drawers. http://www.madrigal.com.au/2015/12/03/knickers-bloomers-drawers/

KNICKERS—I love the British word, knickers, for ladies underpants. It has a gentle naughtiness without being vulgar. In Britain it has surpassed all its rivals: smalls, briefs, panties, bloomers and completely replaced its predecessor, drawers. http://www.madrigal.com.au/2015/12/03/knickers-bloomers-drawers/

Dutch windmill

Have you ever noticed how we use Dutch ironically to describe things as opposite of normal (eg Dutch treat when you buy yourself a gift)?

Trilobite fossil

Trilobite fossil

Calling a yelve a dung fork

The word for a dung fork is a yelve (used for clearing dung from stables or from cattle stalls). This word has now disappeared from English.

English borrows words from other languages when it needs to describe something new. Igloo and Eskimo are obvious ones. They come from the native American languages of Canada. Igloo comes directly from the Innuit word iglu for house.  In comparison Eskimo has a less clear origin.

from Eskimos building an Igloo. I wish I understood more about how these people could survive in such inhospitable climates. no firewood, no vegetables. They had very little to work with, but survived quiet nicely.

Berserk was a great warrior from Norse mythology, renowned for his bravery and for his fury in battle. He didn’t wear armour but went into battle in his bera serkr, in Old Norse, literally bear shirt or bearskin . He gave his name to the berserks, the wild, frenzied shock troops of the marauding Vikings.

Berserk was a great warrior from Norse mythology, renowned for his bravery and for his fury in battle. He didn’t wear armour but went into battle in his bera serkr, in Old Norse, literally bear shirt or bearskin . He gave his name to the berserks, the wild, frenzied shock troops of the marauding Vikings.

Fifty words for rain

The BBC have asked why the British don't have fifty words for rain (AND, apparently, the Inuit don't have 50 words for snow,

Pinterest
Search