Plate 4: ‘Mammals (Iconographie du règne animal, 1829-1844). [print]

‘Mammals’ (Iconographie du règne animal, Distinct Creation Early European Images of Australian Animals "Darwin"

'The Kongouro From New Holland' by George Stubbs - 1773. Stubbs never set foot on Australian soil - and painted this from the sketches of an artist who had died on the voyage back to Britain, and also from a kangaroo skin, which he apparently inflated. This, along with a painting of a dingo by Stubbs are the first painted depictions of Australian animals by a western artist.

Head to head: do the Stubbs paintings belong to Australia, or the UK?

George Stubbs' Portrait of a Large Dog - 1773  (actually a Dingo- although Stubbs never set foot on Australian soil - and painted this from the sketches of an artist who had died on the voyage back to Britain. This, along with a painting of a kangaroo by Stubbs are the first painted depictions of Australian animals by a western artist.

Head to head: do the Stubbs paintings belong to Australia, or the UK?

George Stubbs, Portrait of a Large Dog (First European depiction of an Australian Dingo) 1773 - National maritime Museum

Plate 5: ‘Thylacinus cynocephalus’ (John Gould, The Mammals of Australia, 1863). 1829-1844). [print]

John Gould, Mammals of Australia, THYLACINE - Thylacinus cynocephalus (Tasmanian Wolf, Tasmanian Tiger) by Henry Constantine Richter

Kangaroos and wombats

Kangaroos and wombats

Fig 3: ‘Kangaroo’ (George Barrington, The History of New South Wales, 1802). [print]

Fig ‘Kangaroo’ (George Barrington, The History of New South Wales, [print]

Fig 10: ‘Tasmanian Tiger’ (William Jardine, The Naturalist’s Library, Mammalia, 1841). [print]

Scientists in Australia are investigating what they say are credible reports of a thylacine–a carnivorous marsupial believed that went extinct over 80 years ago. Also called the Tasmanian .

Page 6 - No 66 Spring 2000

Page 6 - No 66 Spring 2000

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