Train passing through flood waters, South Yarra, 25th January 1907. #history #melbourne

Train passing through flood waters, South Yarra, January Melbourne Australia

Kimberly Aboriginal History "Kimberley Tribesmen": Copyright 'The History of the North West of Australia', Edited by JAS. S. Battye, 1915. #HCFpost

Kimberly Aboriginal History "Kimberley Tribesmen": Copyright 'The History of the North West of Australia', Edited by JAS.

Kew Post Office, corner High Street and Cotham Road, c. 1890. Preserved today as QPO Bar and Restaurant

Kew Post Office, corner High Street and Cotham Road, c. Preserved today as QPO Bar and Restaurant. I used to live at almost this vantage point, about a shop in a little over 100 years later

Melbourne’s first cable tram service; between Bridge Road, Richmond, and Spencer Street via Flinders Street, 11 November 1885. Melbourne, Australia

Melbourne's first cable tram service; between Bridge Road, Richmond, and Spencer Street via Flinders Street- 11 November 1885

Digital Photograph - Willis Vale, Greensborough, circa 1920s

Digital Photograph - Feeding the Chooks, 'Willis Vale' Homestead, Greensborough, Victoria, circa

Aboriginal Technology - Women collecting pippies and men cooking them in a sand oven - Source:Thomas Dick Collection, Australian Museum.

Aboriginal Technology - Women collecting pippies and men cooking them in a sand oven - Source:Thomas Dick Collection, Australian Museum.

This photograph shows Mab and Syd Brearley with Tip the dog, taken at the Yarra River, Melbourne, Australia around Studley Park, circa 1913.People would come from places like Brunswick by train and get off at Victoria Park station to walk by the Yarra. Photographer, Stanley Fletcher,. Brunswick. Syd Brearley was a saddler from near Noorat, and he and Mab may have come to Brunswick to visit the family for a holiday. They are wearing their holiday clothes.

Digital Photograph - Man, Woman & Dog Sitting on Banks of Yarra River, Studley Park, circa 1913

Aborigines only make up about two percent of Australia’s population but about 40 percent of those in its prisons. In the Northern Territory, 85 percent of prisoners are Aboriginal

Until the the Aborigines, or Aboriginal Australians, came under the Flora And Fauna Act that classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aborigine meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.

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