Ring with an image of Athena: Tillya Tepe, Tomb 2, Second Quarter of 1st century CE, Gold. This ring depicts the Greek Goddess Athena, who was a popular subject among the nomads, probably because of her warlike nature. The name Athena is engraved in reverse at the left, indicating that the ring was intended as a seal. Her left hand appears to rest on her hip and at the same time hold a lance and a shield.

Ring with a bezel depicting Athena and inscribed with her name Afghanistan, Tillia tepe, tomb II century

Ornament for the neck of a robe: Tillya Tepe, Tomb 5, Second Quarter of the 1st century CE, Gold, turquoise, garnet, pyrites. The other type of pendant consists of granulated rings with a spacer in the form of a double crescent attached. Both of these pendant types have further suspended decoration, first an almond shaped setting with a dark semi-precious stone, and below that a round gold disc.

A first century collar necklace from a tomb in Tillia Tepe, Afghanistan. Photo by Thierry Ollivier/Muse Guimet/Getty Images. Ancient Jewelry Photo Gallery - First Century Collar Necklace - Pictures of Ancient Jewelry

Ornament for the neck of a robe: Tillya Tepe, Tomb 5, Second Quarter of the 1st century CE, Gold, turquoise, garnet, pyrites. This ornament was intended to be sewn to the neck of the wearer’s gown; it has small tubes soldered to the rear of the crescents, through which a thread could pass. The ornament is a combination of two types of pendants. One type consists of smooth hollow beads under which a round setting of semi-precious stones (garnet and turquoise) has been soldered.

A first century collar necklace from a tomb in Tillia Tepe, Afghanistan. Photo by Thierry Ollivier/Muse Guimet/Getty Images. Ancient Jewelry Photo Gallery - First Century Collar Necklace - Pictures of Ancient Jewelry

CROWN, TILLYA TEPE. GOLD. 1ST CENTURY BC – 1ST CENTURY AD Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures features over 230 artworks, including gold objects from the famed Bactrian Hoard, bronze and stone sculptures, ivories, painted glassware, and other ancient works of art. On the below page, we have featured five of these spectacular objects.

Crown, Tomb VI, Tillya Tepe, Afghanistan, second quarter of the century CE

ORNAMENT IN THE FORM OF A RAM, TILLYA TEPE. GOLD. 1ST CENTURY BC – 1ST CENTURY AD Found in 1968 in the principal temple of the city, this head was made by applying layers of clay to a wooden armature (now disintegrated). It comes from a statue that stood against the wall separating the vestibule of the temple from the cult room, a position of honor indicating the importance of the individual portrayed.

Gold ram ornament, Tillya Tepe, attached to high nomad headdress with the rings beneath the hooves

CROWN, TILLYA TEPE. GOLD. 1ST CENTURY BC – 1ST CENTURY AD This crown was found in the tomb of a high-ranking nomadic woman. The base is formed by a diadem decorated with flowers, once inlaid with turquoise centers. The five tall “trees” are inserted into small gold tubes soldered to the inside of the diadem, a system that allowed the crown to be dismantled and easily transported. Golden birds appear in the upper branches of four of the five trees, which represent the Tree of Life.

Crown, Tomb VI, Tillya Tepe, Afghanistan, second quarter of the century CE

Dinosaur Discovery Souvenir Guide A remarkable exhibition of stunning artefacts revealing Afghanistan’s rich culture.  Afghanistan was at the heart of the Silk Road, the trading route travelled by Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan and Marco Polo, linking ancient Iran, Central Asia, India and China, and the more distant cultures of Greece and Rome.

Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures at W. The crown (which breaks down into 5 parts and can be packed flat) is from the Tillya Tepe dig, nomadic burials from roughly 2000 years ago.

Painted Beaker: Begram Room 10, 1st century CE, Glass, enamelled decoration and gilding. This painted beaker depicts a date-palm harvest. The scene shows two female and two male figures between two circular double-bands of yellow and ochre-red. Based on their clothing, the women appear to be of higher standing than the men. Similar painted glasses have been found in Northern Europe and Egypt.

Glass goblet depicting figures harvesting dates (Begram, Room - centuries AD.

Painted Beaker: Begram Room 10, 1st century CE, Glass, enamelled decoration and gilding. This painted beaker depicts a date-palm harvest. The scene shows two female and two male figures between two circular double-bands of yellow and ochre-red. Based on their clothing, the women appear to be of higher standing than the men. Similar painted glasses have been found in Northern Europe and Egypt.

Glass goblet depicting figures harvesting dates (Begram, Room - centuries AD.

STATUETTE OF A WOMAN STANDING ON A MAKARA, BEGRAM. IVORY. 1ST–2ND CENTURIES AD This statuette once decorated a piece of wooden furniture that turned to dust. The woman may represent the Indian river goddess Ganga, whose mount is the mythological makara, a creature that is part crocodile, part elephant, and part fish.

Ivory statuette, possibly representing the Indian river goddess Ganga, standing on a mythological makara (part crocodile, part fish, part elephant). once decorated wooden furniture

PAIR OF PENDANTS DEPICTING THE “DRAGON MASTER”, TILLYA TEPE. GOLD, TURQUOISE, GARNET, LAPIS LAZULI, CARNELIAN AND PEARL. 1ST CENTURY BC – 1ST CENTURY AD These elaborate hair ornaments depict a man wearing the tunic and fl owing pants typical of nomadic dress. He holds two dragon-like creatures by their forelegs, a mythic scene known from ancient Persian and Siberian art that suggests power and invincibility. Most unusually, these pendants are completely finished on both front and back.

Pair of Gold Pendants With Turquoise, Garnet, Lapis Lazuli, Carnelian & Pearls Showing The “Dragon Master,” From The Second Quarter of The First Century A. Found At Tillya Tepe In Northern Afghanistan.

MALE OR FEMALE HEAD, AÏ KHANUM. UNFIRED CLAY. 2ND CENTURY BC Found in 1968 in the principal temple of the city, this head was made by applying layers of clay to a wooden armature (now disintegrated). It comes from a statue that stood against the wall separating the vestibule of the temple from the cult room, a position of honor indicating the importance of the individual portrayed.

Male or female head of clay (Ai Khanum, Temple with niches, Courtyard), century BC.

Afghanistan  - Photograph by Barat Ali Batoor The Western Australian Museum – Perth presents a selection of his photography in the free exhibition, Afghanistan:

Afghanistan - Photograph by Barat Ali Batoor The Western Australian Museum – Perth presents a selection of his photography in the free exhibition, Afghanistan:

Ram - ORNAMENT IN THE FORM OF A RAM, TILLYA TEPE, GOLD, 1ST CENTURY B.C. – 1ST CENTURY A.D.  -

The Western Australian Museum – Perth has now closed to the public while we create the New Museum for WA, scheduled to open in the Perth Cultural Centre in This does not mean the WA Museum is closed for business.

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